Home Music The Story Of John Coltrane’s ‘A Love Supreme’

The Story Of John Coltrane’s ‘A Love Supreme’

From NPR:

John Coltrane recorded A Love Supreme in December of 1964 and released it the following year. He presented it as a spiritual declaration that his musical devotion was now intertwined with his faith in God. In many ways, the album mirrors Coltrane’s spiritual quest that grew out of his personal troubles, including a long struggle with drug and alcohol addiction.

From the opening gong and tenor saxophone flutter, a four-note bass line builds under the sound. This simple riff becomes the musical framework for the rich improvisations that comprise John Coltrane’s 33-minute musical journey.

I couldn’t wait to go to work at night. It was just such a wonderful experience. I mean, I didn’t know what we were going to do. We couldn’t really explain why things came together.
– McCoy Tyner

“I remember they cut the lights down kind of,” says McCoy Tyner, who played piano on A Love Supreme as a member of Coltrane’s band in the early and mid-’60s. “The lights were dimmed in the studio. I guess they were trying to get a nightclub effect or whatever. I don’t know if it was John’s suggestion or whatever. I remember the lights being dimmed.”

It made sense to try to imitate the dim-lighted intimacy of a club during the studio recordings, he says, because it was on stage during live shows where the quartet would explore, practice and rehearse new material. He says there was an amazing unspoken communication during the “Love Supreme” sessions. In fact, he says, Coltrane gave very few verbal directions. Tyner calls the album a culmination and natural extension of chemistry honed through years of playing together live.

“You see, one thing about that music is that it showed you that we had reached a level where you could move the music around. John had a very wonderful way of being flexible with the music, flexing it, stretching it. You know, we reflected that kind of thing. He gave us the freedom to do that. We thought of something, ‘Oh, then we’ll play it,’ you know? And he said, ‘Yeah, I have a feeling’—you know? And all that freedom just came together when we did that record.”

Continue reading the rest of the story on NPR