“Bay-bay,” and other horrors on the proper pop pronunciation list

From CBC:

Misunderstood lyrics are an art form in and of themselves. Head on over to YouTube and you’ll find countless collections of songs with their phonetically deduced words flashing across the clips. Sometimes we blame ourselves for these mondegreens, but what can you do if a singer chooses to come up with some new way of pronouncing a word?

Case in point: “umbrella, ella, ella, ella, ayayay.” Hey Rihanna, umbrella is only three syllables! That said, there is such a thing as musical licence. Just as a sculptor is free to create with their medium, so too does a singer get to make a word as malleable as a chunk of clay.

And boy, do these stars really bend the English language.

1. “Human Behaviour,” Bjork
What I hear: “An ch-uman B-haing.”
Actual lyric: “A human being.”

isunderstood lyrics are an art form in and of themselves. Head on over to YouTube and you’ll find countless collections of songs with their phonetically deduced words flashing across the clips. Sometimes we blame ourselves for these mondegreens, but what can you do if a singer chooses to come up with some new way of pronouncing a word?

Case in point: “umbrella, ella, ella, ella, ayayay.” Hey Rihanna, umbrella is only three syllables! That said, there is such a thing as musical licence. Just as a sculptor is free to create with their medium, so too does a singer get to make a word as malleable as a chunk of clay.

And boy, do these stars really bend the English language.

1. “Human Behaviour,” Bjork
What I hear: “An ch-uman B-haing.”
Actual lyric: “A human being.”

isunderstood lyrics are an art form in and of themselves. Head on over to YouTube and you’ll find countless collections of songs with their phonetically deduced words flashing across the clips. Sometimes we blame ourselves for these mondegreens, but what can you do if a singer chooses to come up with some new way of pronouncing a word?

Case in point: “umbrella, ella, ella, ella, ayayay.” Hey Rihanna, umbrella is only three syllables! That said, there is such a thing as musical licence. Just as a sculptor is free to create with their medium, so too does a singer get to make a word as malleable as a chunk of clay.

And boy, do these stars really bend the English language.

1. “Human Behaviour,” Bjork
What I hear: “An ch-uman B-haing.”
Actual lyric: “A human being.”

2. “Hit me Baby One More Time,” Britney Spears
What I hear: “Oh, bay-bai baiy-bai”
Actual lyric: “Oh baby baby.”

3. “In Da Club,” 50 Cent
What I hear: “isher birf-day”
Actual lyric: “It’s your birthday.”

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