Words That Are Much Older Than They Seem

Dictionary_Icon

From Mental Floss:

Every generation likes to think it invented slang anew, but often the latest words are actually very old. Here are 16 words that are much older than they seem. (The example quotes all come from the Oxford English Dictionary.)

1. FRIEND, AS A VERB

A common lament in pieces about “kids these days and their social whatsawhozits” is “when did ‘friend’ become a verb?!” The answer is: Sometime in the 1400s. In the earliest examples of the verb “friend” from the OED, it means to make friends. You could go to a place, and “friend” some people there. It also had the meaning of help someone out, be a friend to them, e.g., “Reports came that the King would friend Lauderdale,” an example from 1698.

2. UNFRIEND

If you could friend someone, it was only natural, according to the productive rules of English word formation, that you could unfriend them too. The word shows up in this example from 1659: “I Hope, Sir, that we are not mutually Un-friended by this Difference which hath happened betwixt us.”

3. DUDE

In the 1880s “dude” had a negative, mocking ring to it. A dude was a dandy, someone very particular about clothes, looks, and mannerisms, who affected a sort of exaggerated high-class British persona. As one Brit noted in 1886, “Our novels establish a false ideal in the American imagination, and the result is that mysterious being ‘The Dude’.” To those out west, it became a word for clueless city-dwellers of all kinds (hence, the dude ranch, for tourists). By the turn of the century it had come to mean any guy, usually a pretty cool one. As one Navy man explained in 1918, “in a gang of snipes there is generally one dude who is known as the ‘king snipe’.”

4. DUDERY

Where “dude” goes, “dudery” follows. Here’s a phrase from 1889 that sounds completely and utterly current: “The Pharisaical dudery which presumes to deny her [woman] a place in the world…equal with man.”

5. HANG OUT

“Hang out” has been used as a verb for passing the time without doing much in particular since at least the 1840s. By the 1860s it was kind of slangy, but not unusual, to ask, “Where do you hang out?”

6. PUKE

Puke has been around since the 16th century. While it is often claimed that Shakespeare invented “puke,” the word has been found in earlier sources. It meant then what it means now, to vomit. But it also used to be a causative verb, meaning to make someone vomit with a tonic or potion. Your doctor might have you purged, bled, and puked for your own good.

Continue reading the rest of the story on Mental Floss