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The Beastie Boys recorded a version of this song to be featured on their debut album, Licensed to Ill, The lyrics, tempo and melody were substantially different but on the chorus portion “How can you laugh” used a sample of the original Beatles recording without securing permission to do so. In the January 13, 1987, issue of the Village Voice, Greil Marcus reviews the track, writing:

The old Beatle screamer, scheduled for Licensed to Ill but chilled by new copyright owner Michael Jackson because of supposed bad language, this is circulating, even on the radio. On one hearing, it sounds more like the Beach Boys having fun with “Barbara Ann” than the bloody killer rape job you might expect.

The song was indeed deleted from the final track list at the last minute due to licensing restraints but can be found on some Beastie Boys bootlegs.

Billboard magazine has decided to create a new Americana and Folk Albums chart in a move that recognizes the rise of artists — such as Jason Isbell and the Lumineers —who have enjoyed commercial success.

Billboard announced the chart change on Thursday, effective June 4, in an email to record executives. The chart was previously called the Folk Albums chart, leaving some Americana artists without a go-to chart.

The move comes a few months after heated debate when the country-folk band Green River Ordinance was left off the Country Albums chart, but slotted on the Folk and Rock charts. And the new chart serves as another piece of recognition for the rise of Americana, the broad umbrella of a genre that covers American roots music from multiple sub-genres — country, rock, blues, folk and jazz, among others.

“This change recognizes the growth of Americana and the prominent rise of the term overall, both within the industry and in widespread music coverage,” said Gary Trust, co-director of charts for Billboard in email forwarded to The Tennessean.

Via

There are three things you can’t touch.

This.

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…The Toronto Blue Jays baseball team led by this guy.

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…and what Rogers and Samsung has been able to do with your television viewing opportunities.

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All the time when the Toronto Blue Jays were writing their historic season last year ending with the Jays only 90 feet away from a tie, to later fall 4-3 in Game 6 of the American League Championship Series to lose the series, four games to two, Samsung was putting the finishing touches on making their viewing experience even more heart-pounding, if that was even possible.

Baseball to me isn’t just a game, just like music isn’t just a medium of sound and silence. Basebal is an event with a heart, a life force, a profound spirituality and a vital part of my life. As a lover of the Jays, I enjoy going to the Rogers Centre where I can relax, have some peanuts and hot dogs and possibly be yelled at from the people around me for singing OK Blue Jays, Let’s Play Ball a little too off-key. “You were great, Dad!” my daughter would say, trying to be nice. “During some of the singing, I could see dogs perking up without anyone else hearing that really high note!”

And then I would spend an average of 96 minutes- more than half the game – just looking for Rush’s Geddy Lee sitting behind home plate.

The way I got into the Jays was like any other kid in Toronto in the ’70s. First, watching them play at Exhibition Stadium, where I was at the first game back in April, 19777, along with 86 million other liars who claim to be there. Then, watching them throughout the year, culminating into their two World Series titles. And now, with my daughter, we get to watch them at the Rogers Centre and create those moments like I remember with my dad all those years ago – exciting, hungry, eating too much, getting sick, getting excited again, sleeping in the car on the way home. By the time morning came, I realized it was the greatest day I ever spent.

Last season’s success for the Jays caused such a great demand for tickets that the City of Toronto actually got to stop building its dream superb subway system costing billions of dollars because we put it all towards buying Jays hats, jerseys, and Rush albums on vinyl. The Jays again have a huge uptick in a fan base across Canada, and around the world for the team. With sell-out after sell-out, more people are watching baseball at home in record numbers. This is where Rogers and Samsung comes in.

Actually, let’s go back about 50 years. Samsung was founded by Lee Byung-chul in 1938 as a trading company. Over the next three decades, the group diversified into areas including food processing, textiles, insurance, securities and retail. Samsung entered the electronics industry in the late 1960s by forming several electronics-related divisions, such as Samsung Electronics Devices, Samsung Electro-Mechanics, Samsung Corning and Samsung Semiconductor & Telecommunications, and made the facility in Suwon. Its first product was a black-and-white television set.

I’ve long admired their products. Their televisions even back then were extraordinary, powerful and compelling. Today, their 55″ Samsung UN55JS8500 4K SUHD 3D Smart LED TV in the ultimate realization of a visionary project, tracking between two different worlds – the actual content and clearness of that product, and the cutting-edge online world of YouTube and social media. This more affordable 4K LED backlit offering from Samsung has some excellent features. The 8500 series has a slightly lower Clear Motion Rate, edge-lit LEDs and thus an edge lit dimming platform, lower LED peak brightness, awesome specs and new color technologies. With SUHD 4K TVs, now you can experience stunning colors, deep contrast, incredible brightness, and 4K resolution that redefines your TV viewing experience.

That means, for most people, you can go to YouTube, watch the latest videos there, and also Tweet your heart out at the same time. From your TV. This blows my mind. The above jargon is for readers who truly accept and understand this is one remarkable television. You should know that I am fine, decent and inquisitive man, but unfortunately I have barely more technical knowledge than a baked potato.

But what I do know is this: The Samsung UN55JS8500 Smart TV provides one place to enjoy content from a wide range of sources. You can easily connect the Smart TV wirelessly with your compatible smartphone for streaming and content sharing. It also lets you access your favorite program choices, live TV, video on demand, streaming sources, apps and social media in one easy-to-browse navigation experience.

In order to watch on your 4K TV, the Rogers NextBox set-top box go hand in hand. Without content (viewed through your 4K box), you’re watching on a blank screen. That’s not what you want. Sportsnet will be airing all 81 Blue Jays home games in 4K, so you have to get the Rogers NextBox set-top box. Rogers continues to expand its 4K offering throughout the year, so this is terrific news.

Watching the Blue Jays has given me a bit of a creative spark online, so I’ll be live-tweeting throughout the season fun facts about the team, score updates, player trivia and anything else I can think of with the hashtag #LifeIn4K, so you can follow along, too!

This is assuming that I ever leave my house again. Once you see it for yourself, you may never, too.

By the way, Samsung provided my new 4K TV and Rogers provided my Rogers Nextbox 4K set-top box, but as the Jays’ owners provide the players’ salaries,  I’m the owner of my own words and enthusiasm here.

Record Store Day (April 17) releases swarm the Tastemakers Albums, Vinyl Albums and Hot Singles Sales charts as the annual independent music retailer celebration brings a bevy of unique, limited-edition and vinyl titles to the lists.
In the U.S., indie retailers sold 30 percent of all physical albums and singles in the week ending April 21 (749,000 out of 2.5 million), according to Nielsen Music. Vinyl LP sales were unsurprisingly robust during the latest tracking week as the vast majority of Record Store Day releases are produced on the format — with 521,000 vinyl albums sold during the tracking week (up 131 percent). That’s the largest week for the format since the frame ending Dec. 24, 2015 (753,000), and the biggest week for vinyl LPs outside of the Christmas season since Nielsen started tracking sales in 1991.

Some further statistics about Record Store Day and vinyl sales in the week ending April 21:
— 13 percent of all albums sold were on vinyl (521,000 of 4.1 million).
— Indie stores sold 74 percent of all vinyl albums for the week.
— Indie stores sold 640,000 albums – a gain of 131 percent compared to the previous week (278,000).
— Indie stores sold 383,000 vinyl albums – a gain of 320 percent compared to the previous week (91,000).
— Indie stores sold 108,000 physical singles – a gain of 2,600 percent compared to the previous week (4,000).
— Indie stores sold 100,000 12” vinyl singles – a gain of 4,900 percent compared to the previous week (2,000).
— Record Store Day limited edition albums and singles combined to sell nearly 300,000 copies, according to Nielsen Music.

Via Billboard

The news of Prince’s death last week has now translated into a massive increase in sales and downloads of his music across Canada. According to Nielsen Music, four Prince albums are in the Billboard Canadian Top 200 album consumption chart (which includes track equivalent sales and stream equivalent sales), and last week Canadians purchased 8,000 Prince albums, which is more than twice the 3,250 that were sold in 2016 before last week. 38,000 of Prince’s digital tracks were purchased last week, vs. 15,000 for the rest of 2016.

ON THE CANADIAN BILLBOARD CHARTS:
• Very Best Of Prince is #1
• Purple Rain #26
• The Hits/The B-Sides #61
• Ultimate #131

On the Digital Songs chart, 11 songs entered the top 200:
• Purple Rain #13
• When Doves Cry #20
• Kiss #23
• Little Red Corvette #28
• Let’s Go Crazy #33
• 1999 #45
• Raspberry Beret #48
• I Would Die 4 U #83
• Cream #136
• U Got The Look #165
• I Wanna Be Your Lover #184

Justin Bieber’s “Love Yourself” drops 6-8 on this week’s Hot 100 after topping the chart for two (nonconsecutive) weeks, and grants Bieber history: it has spent its first 22 weeks on the Hot 100 in the top 10, dating to its debut at No. 4 on the Dec. 5 chart. With its latest week in the region, “Love Yourself” breaks the record for the most consecutive weeks logged in the top 10 from a song’s debut, passing his two prior singles from his album Purpose, as well as two other tracks.

Here is an updated look at the songs to debut in the Hot 100’s top 10 and remain in the tier for the most consecutive weeks:

22 weeks, “Love Yourself,” Justin Bieber (2015-16)
21 weeks, “Sorry,” Bieber (2015-16)
21 weeks, “What Do You Mean?,” Bieber (2015-16)
21 weeks, “Sugar,” Maroon 5 (2015)
21 weeks, “Starships,” Nicki Minaj (2012)

Via

The Power Station was a 1980s supergroup made up of singer Robert Palmer, former Chic drummer Tony Thompson, and Duran Duran members bassist John Taylor and guitarist Andy Taylor. Bernard Edwards, also of Chic, was involved on the studio side as recording producer and for a short time also functioned as The Power Station’s manager. Edwards also replaced John Taylor on bass for the recording of the supergroup’s follow-up album. The band was formed in New York City late in 1984 during a break in Duran Duran’s schedule that became a lengthy hiatus.

The success of the band was really extraordinary. The quality of the videos and performances was far superior to most 80s bands, and hit on all the major genres of the era – rock, pop, r&b, metal, and punk. Three singles were released from the album, two of them major hits. The first, “Some Like It Hot”, reached number 14 on the UK Singles Chart and number 6 on the US Billboard Hot 100. The second single, “Get It On (Bang a Gong)”, went to number 22 in the United Kingdom and number 9 in the United States, while competing against the Duran Duran single “A View to a Kill”, which was an American number one.

The group’s unexpected success led to two incompatible results: first, the band decided to headline a summer tour in America with Paul Young, Nik Kershaw and Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark; second, Robert Palmer decided to record a solo album to take advantage of his sudden name recognition. This led to Palmer’s departure from the band. (Tony Thompson, Andy Taylor and future Power Station bass player Bernard Edwards all contributed to Palmer’s highly successful 1985 solo album Riptide.)

When Palmer left, they recruited singer/actor Michael Des Barres (formerly of Silverhead, Chequered Past and Detective) for the tour. Des Barres also performed with them at the Live Aid charity concert in Philadelphia that summer.

One thing is for sure when you talk to Michael, he’s exactly how you hope a lead singer would be – funny, larger than life, smart, and has a memory like an elephant. He’s thoughtful enough to sing the praises of others, while also expressing gratitude of discovering on a daily basis, just how wonderful this life is for him.

Eric: How did you first get involved in The Power Station in the beginning?
Michael Des Barres: It’s a crazy story. In 1985, I was in Texas with my friend, Don Johnson, and another friend, who I don’t want to bring up names here. There I am with Don and old friends we are. And he was making a movie! I got a call at this hotel, and they asked “What are you doing this summer?” I said “Hanging out and celebrate ‘Obsession’ (the Animotion song written by Michael) number one all over the world.” He said “I want you to come to New York to meet these guys and they want you to front this band.” I said “Are you flying in the first class?” and he said “Yes.” So I said, “See you soon.” There was a huge white limo and got to this office right away at Manhattan.
Eric: Which band did you think it is at this point? Did you have any guesses?
Michael: I didn’t care! I’m off to New York! So there I was at New York, walking to the office. John Taylor sweating and Tony Thompson seemingly nervous, because they both were on tour. Robert, who I’ve known, by the way, for 20 years start to this. My first band in 1972, he was in a band called Vinegar Joe, and a lovely, lovely man. Now they were there. I was like, “Oh my God, this is The Power Station. They’re the number one!” I mean that album was massive already. So I was sitting there, and I got quickly interjected with these guys. A bit of advice to say right here – always be ready, because you never know when the magic strikes. What did I do? They have flied to London that night on the Concorde to meet with Andy Taylor. I went straight to the recording studio and I’ve already got takes from the album. Took his voice, learned the words. We did 8 hours until Andy to turn up. He shared with a couple of his bodyguards that feeling smoked from strange cigarette. He comes in quick and said “Ok, hit it Michael.” I sang the verse and chorus quick. “Let’s go shopping,” said Andy Taylor.
Eric: At that point, when you knew it was The Power Station, and you know that you were also friends with Robert Palmer. Does it ever occur to you not to do this, for fear of ruining a friendship?
Michael: I would never have any of those thoughts. Are you kidding? All I ever thought about won’t wear a suit. I was delighted to bein the band. I can’t think of negative things, you know? I can’t worry what people would think about me, because you can’t please everybody. You’re gonna get a couple of chats from the couch if they don’t like you. This is gonna happen, and I could care less. It was so fast and magical, but I went through a time in my life to stop being negative. Once I got back to New York, Andy was in and he wanted to meet me. I checked him to the car hotel, but I got a call from the manager saying, “Michael you’re out. Robert has decided to do the tour.” I went to the dinner with Don to this Chinese restaurant, and there was John Taylor at another table. Looking at me sort of sheepishly. Don went over to John, and says “Can I have a word with you?” I don’t know what they said still today. We came back after finishing the dinner and went back to Colorado to fly back to LA. At 7AM I got a call, saying “Michael, you’re back in.”
Eric: Wow, what do you think he said?
Michael: I never knew, but, I think that Robert Palmer is one of the greatest artists that we’ve ever had. But as a performer, he loses his left shoulder a couple of inches in here and there. So that you got the crowd of 20, 40, 60 thousand people, all 16 years old girls, and usually topless. So Robert Palmer perhaps was not the right guy to focus on kids go crazy.

Eric: The Power Station were so cool. They had one of the most popular guitarists and bassists in the world. You had Robert Palmer, and Tony Thompson. It wouldn’t work on paper, but it did.
Michael: Yeah, it was great recording unit. They made great records. Andy is a rock n’roll star. He was already kind of wanting to move in a rockier direction, which I moved in to him, because I introduced him to Steve Johns and they did an album together, Steve and Andy, and Andy’s solo record which is rocking. It was distort group of musicians. It goes to prove that you cannot categorize yourself. You got to be opened. I couldn’t sing Robert. Robert Palmer’s voice is very contained – he’s almost like baritone. I’m out there and playing to each and every person in the crowd. So I need to come down and somehow interpret these great songs.

Eric: How was Live Aid for you? Your friend Don Johnson was the one that introduced you. In the stretch of an hour or so, performing were Neil Young, The Power Station, Thompson Twins, Eric Clapton, the CSNY reunion, and then Duran Duran. Those two hours backstage must have been just the greatest rock n’roll experience at the time, or ever.
Michael: The greatest rock n’roll experience that anybody ever had was at the hotel! All the people you’ve mentioned were at the hotel. We just played a gig for almost two billion people.
Eric: Do you remember being on stage for those moments?
Michael: I was on stage? Ha! Of course I remember it.
Eric: Did you feel any different than any other shows that you were doing at the time? Forget the television audience for a moment – or can you?
Michael: Of course. I was levitating. If you look at the tape now, you could clearly see me levitating. I was so excited. It’s amazing. There were so many people, I that were so nervous, I mean people writing the words of their biggest songs on the palm of their hands with a magic marker. I was standing next to Madonna and she was just breaking in. She was shaking so much that she was going mad. It was beautiful. So you’ve got to know the two things going on. One is yourself helping out the starving people in Africa, and showing the power of music to help. But on the other hand, it was a good career move that they caught on you on your business. It was fascinating. You had Bob Dylan, Keith Richards, and Ronnie Wood playing in different keys for the same song. There were so many things going on that it was such a magic. You could make a move at the back stage at night back in the hotel, be equally be interesting concert itself.

Eric: Do you still keep in touch with John and Andy Taylor?
Michael: Yes, I still text with them and send each other a Valentine’s card. I love John. He’s beautiful, brilliant musician, writer, and a huge heart. And I love Andy. He’s very close. I don’t hear from him much. He lives in Ibiza. He’s isolated now but I’d love to see him. I try to remain connected with all of the people that I had an incredible core experiences with. It’s important to me that the people and friendships remain.