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Canadian consumers love music, and they’re spending more time with it in more ways. This is particularly the case with Canadian teens. According to Nielsen’s Music 360 Canada report, consumers in Canada report listening to 20% more music than they did in 2013. For teens, the lift is even higher at 40%. What’s driving the surge? Music consumption on tablets and smartphones, which is at an all-time high, and growth in streaming.

While 90% of Canadians report listening to 24 hours of music a week, 95% of Canadian teens listen to an average of 31 hours. Most Canadians listen to music in the background while doing other activities, especially teens, who spend one-third of their music time doing other things, like playing video games, reading and surfing the Internet.

As they are everywhere, technological shifts are affecting music consumption in Canada. For example, streaming volume is up 94% since Nielsen began tracking streaming activity in July 2014. The number of Canadians who report streaming music in the past year has grown to 71%, with teens spending twice as much time streaming music as the general Canadian population. However, Francophone Canadians generally stream less than the overall population.

Both teens and Millennials value the social aspects of streaming services, and teens are especially inclined to discover music through friends or relatives. Free video streaming is the key driver to how teens discover new music, although on the whole, radio remains the top format for discovery, as two-thirds of Canadians use radio to discover new music.

Among music listeners, at least half of all smartphone and computer owners use a digital music service on their device. Seventy-four percent of Canadian teens own a smartphone, and they’re more likely to use these devices to listen to music than other generational groups. And what are they listening to? While most music listeners in Canada select rock or pop, Canadian teens are listening to dance, hip hop and rap.

The Nielsen Music 360 Canada Study is a comprehensive in-depth study of consumer interaction with music in Canada. Data for the study was collected April 12-27, 2015 among 3,500 consumers ages 13+. Surveys were conducted online using a third party panel and data was weighted to the Canadian census population based on age, gender, race, education and household size.

The Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada announced complete financial results for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2014. The announcement of final official results followed the organization’s preview of financial figures on February 10, 2015, and coincided with SOCAN’s annual general meeting, held this year in Toronto.

Highlights:
* A record year for total revenue – $299.5-million brought in for members, an increase of approximately 8.4 per cent over 2013.
* Record international revenue of $55.5-million, an increase of 8.3 per cent over 2013.
* Internet streaming revenues of $21.3-million – up from $3.4-million in 2013.
* A record-low Corporate Net Expense Ratio of 9.5 percent – a 2.5-point improvement over 2014, making SOCAN one of the most cost-effective major music rights organizations in the world.
* $241-million distributed to members.

SOCAN continues to improve efficiencies and services, benefitting from technology advances, a more streamlined organization, and strategic departmental adjustments.

“SOCAN is one of the Canadian music ecosystem’s greatest success stories,” said CEO Eric Baptiste. “We’re fighting for our members’ rights every minute of every day, and uncovering more places where their music is performed in public in Canada and worldwide, ensuring that every penny a music creator and music publisher has fairly earned ends up in his or her pocket. Our 2014 results are testament to our success working for our songwriter, composer and music publisher members.”

SOCAN also reported that on June 15, 2015, the total number of the organization’s members surpassed 130,000 – an increase of more than 5,000 since this time last year.

For full financial statements and a complete overview of 2014, please visit www.socanannualreport.ca.

As the demand for festivals becomes ever greater, a potential supply-side problem has started to become apparent. It hints at how the music industry has changed rapidly over the past ten years, and how it may need to adapt.

Over the past decade sales of recorded music fell sharply. According to the BPI, an industry body, income from recorded music fell from £1.2 billion in 2004 to just under £700m in 2014. The fall has slowed in recent years, partly because of the increase in online streaming, which accounted for £115m in 2014. But other revenue streams have become far more important—particularly the live music industry. In 2011 it was worth £1.6 billion, according to PRS for Music, which collects royalties on behalf of writers and publishers.

Artists bag only 10% of the net profit from recorded music, but can command up to 90% of gross ticket receipts. And promoters can make money from large, captive audiences by charging eye-watering prices for food, merchandise and parking.

However, the popularity of festivals poses a problem. As they have grown in Britain so too have they blossomed in America, Asia and Europe. But the pool of artists who appeal to large, diverse crowds and have enough music to play for an hour or more has not increased at the same rate. This means that there are not enough big headliners to go around. Analysis by Will Page, the director of economics at Spotify, a streaming service, shows that the average age of headline acts at nine festivals in Britain has gradually risen (see chart). In the 1990s, bands in their mid-twenties, such as Radiohead, headlined at Glastonbury, points out Mr Page. Although exceptions exist—this year, the 28-year-old Florence Welch was drafted in at the last minute to headline the Friday slot—it appears to be getting rarer, he says.

Part of the reason for this may be that punters themselves are ageing: according to Festival Insights, an industry publication, in 2014 the average age of a festival-goer was 33. Promoters may be reacting to this by putting on older acts. But it also reflects a supply-side constraint in the market, says Chris Carey, a music consultant. Fewer small clubs and pubs exist for new young bands to start out, he says, and older bands are still keen to perform live in order to boost their coffers. This means that fledgling artists find it both harder to start a career and to muscle in to a headline slot once they have gained momentum.

Via The Economist

Viola Liuzzo was a Unitarian Universalist civil rights activist from Michigan. In March 1965 Liuzzo, then a housewife and mother of 5 with a history of local activism, heeded the call of Martin Luther King Jr and traveled from Detroit, Michigan to Selma, Alabama in the wake of the Bloody Sunday attempt at marching across the Edmund Pettus Bridge. Liuzzo participated in the successful Selma to Montgomery marches and helped with coordination and logistics. Driving back from a trip shuttling fellow activists to the Montgomery airport, she was shot dead by members of the Ku Klux Klan. She was 39 years old.

Viola_Liuzzo

Just before the 24th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s April 4, 1968 murder, Tony Bennett appeared on the Arsenio Hall show to talk about the bloody 1965 Selma to Montgomery march he participated in at Harry Belafonte’s request. After the march, Bennett revealed, he was driven to the airport by Liuzzo. After leaving the airport, Liuzzo was shot and killed.

Via the May 1992 issue of Rock & Rap Confidential.

As it extends its run atop the Hot 100, Wiz Khalifa’s ‘See You Again’ is one of just nine rap hits (defined as titles which have appeared on Hot Rap Songs) that have led the Hot 100 for nine weeks or more. Here’s an updated look at the rap No. 1s that have ruled the Hot 100 the longest:

Longest-Leading Rap Hits on the Hot 100
Weeks at No. 1, Title, Artist(s), Date Reached No. 1
12, “Boom Boom Pow,” the Black Eyed Peas, April 18, 2009
12, “Lose Yourself,” Eminem, Nov. 9, 2002
11, “I’ll Be Missing You,” Puff Daddy & Faith Evans feat. 112, June 14, 1997
10, “Low,” Flo Rida feat. T-Pain, Jan. 5, 2008
10, “Gold Digger,” Kanye West feat. Jamie Foxx, Sept. 17, 2005
10, “Dilemma,” Nelly feat. Kelly Rowland, Aug. 17, 2002
9, “See You Again,” Wiz Khalifa feat. Charlie Puth, April 25, 2015
9, “Candy Shop,” 50 Cent feat. Olivia, March 5, 2005
9, “In Da Club,” 50 Cent, March 8, 2003

Via Billboard

Foreign music fans visiting the UK for gigs and festivals boosted the economy by £3.1bn in 2014, a report says.

The report by industry body UK Music said foreign visitors spent an average of £751 and helped sustain almost 40,000 full time jobs.

Across the UK 9.5 million people travelled to music events. Researchers also found a 39% rise in the number of overseas tourists travelling to the UK for music over the last four years.

Via BBC

Here’s something I’ve never, ever thought about before, but once I heard about this, always wondered in the back of my mind, since I already know how Caramilk gets the caramel in the chocolate bar. At 210 calories, an unfrosted strawberry Pop-Tart had 10 more calories per serving than its frosted counterpart.

The question has gone viral online, with a few blogs looking to capture an answer. After contacting Kellogg’s, Quartz finally has solved the mystery of the unfrosted Pop-Tarts.

“Unfrosted Pop-Tarts have a slightly thicker crust to compensate for the lack of frosting, resulting in a few more calories per serving,” a Kellogg’s representative told Quartz in an email. It compensates for its sad lack of frosting in several ways, the representative said: “the overall composition of the food, including weight, breakability, toastabilty.”

Via Quartz

From the “I bet you didn’t know this” file – Emerson Drive have officially achieved their 20th Top 10 single with “Who We Are” at Canadian Country radio this week. The band now holds the record for the most Canadian Top 10’s in the modern music era. Who would have guessed them? I mean, they’re amazing guys, slightly superior over most country acts these days, and some of the finest lyrics on the radio, but…it would have taken me a few guesses to get to them. At least.

Emerson Drive’s extensive background in the country music landscape is undeniable. For well over a decade, the band has produced such hits as “I Should Be Sleeping,” “Moments,” “Fall Into Me” and their latest GOLD single – “She’s My Kind Of Crazy.” They have countless Canadian Country Music Association (CCMA) award wins, including three for Group or Duo of the Year, and they’re one of the only Canadian country bands in history to hold nominations from the Academy of Country Music awards (ACMs), the Country Music Association awards (CMAs) and the Grammys in the U.S., solidifying them as one of the great bands of all time.

President of Invictus Entertainment Group, Jim Cressman says “Longevity isn’t ubiquitous in this industry. By evolving their sound and listening to their fans, these guys have stood the test of time and are more relevant than ever.”

Expect new music from Emerson Drive on June 16th when their new single “Till The Summer’s Gone” hits radio.

Upcoming Canadian dates:
June 27, Cider Fest – Winona, ON
June 28, CRIR Festival – Strathmore, AB
June 30, Abbotsford Centre – Abbotsford, BC
July 25, Spencerville Stampede – Spencerville, ON
July 30, Cedarcreek Winery – Kelowna, BC
August 14, Arnprior Fair – Arnprior, ON

Adele’s 21 is the biggest selling album of the decade to date, the Official Charts Company can reveal. The singer-songwriter’s second studio album – which spent a massive 23 weeks at Number 1 – has sold just over 4,751,000 copies in the UK.

Take That’s Progress earns the Number 2 spot with sales of over 2,374,000 since its 2010 release. The former Official Albums Chart Number 1 shifted an impressive 519,000 copies in its opening week and spawned three Top 40 singles: The Flood, Kidz and Love Love.

In at Number 3 is Michael Buble’s festive album Christmas, which counts 2,216,000 sales this decade. The album spent three weeks at the Official Albums Chart summit and has entered the Top 10 every year since its 2011 release. To date, the LP has racked up 31 weeks in the Top 40.

The fourth best-selling album since 2010 is Emeli Sande’s debut Our Version Of Events. The record, which has sold 2,208,000 copies since its 2012 release, features six singles including Top 10 hits Heaven (Number 2), Next To Me (2), Read All About It Pt 3 (3) and Clown (4). The album also holds the title for the longest reign in the Top 10 of any debut album, surpassing The Beatles’ debut Please Please Me.

Rounding out the Top 5 is Ed Sheeran’s second album X. The chart-topping LP has now shifted 2,134,000copies since its release last July and was the biggest selling album of 2014. His 2011 debut, +, is just behind at 6 on sales of 1,958,000.

Notable additions further down the Top 40 list include Ellie Goulding, whose album Halcyon has passed one million sales and is the 23rd best-seller of the decade so far, while One Direction and Olly Murs each claim three of the decade’s 40 best sellers.

Meanwhile, Rihanna, Pink, Bruno Mars, Lady Gaga and Michael Buble each have two albums on the list.

The Official Biggest Selling Artist Albums of the decade so far are:

1 21 ADELE
2 PROGRESS TAKE THAT
3 CHRISTMAS MICHAEL BUBLE
4 OUR VERSION OF EVENTS EMELI SANDE
5 X ED SHEERAN
6 + ED SHEERAN
7 LOUD RIHANNA
8 CRAZY LOVE MICHAEL BUBLE
9 IN THE LONELY HOUR SAM SMITH
10 DOO-WOPS & HOOLIGANS BRUNO MARS
11 19 ADELE
12 THE FAME LADY GAGA
13 MYLO XYLOTO COLDPLAY
14 SIGH NO MORE MUMFORD & SONS
15 THE DEFAMATION OF STRICKLAND BANKS PLAN B
16 RIGHT PLACE RIGHT TIME OLLY MURS
17 WHO YOU ARE JESSIE J
18 TEENAGE DREAM KATY PERRY
19 LUNGS FLORENCE & THE MACHINE
20 UP ALL NIGHT ONE DIRECTION
21 IN CASE YOU DIDN’T KNOW OLLY MURS
22 BABEL MUMFORD & SONS
23 HALCYON ELLIE GOULDING
24 TALK THAT TALK RIHANNA
25 WANTED ON VOYAGE GEORGE EZRA
26 SUNNY SIDE UP PAOLO NUTINI
27 BORN TO DIE LANA DEL REY
28 TAKE ME HOME ONE DIRECTION
29 BORN THIS WAY LADY GAGA
30 UNORTHODOX JUKEBOX BRUNO MARS
31 GREATEST HITS BON JOVI
32 RECOVERY EMINEM
33 COME AROUND SUNDOWN KINGS OF LEON
34 THE ELEMENT OF FREEDOM ALICIA KEYS
35 GREATEST HITS – SO FAR PINK
36 MIDNIGHT MEMORIES ONE DIRECTION
37 THE TRUTH ABOUT LOVE PINK
38 18 MONTHS CALVIN HARRIS
39 LIONESS – HIDDEN TREASURES AMY WINEHOUSE
40 OLLY MURS OLLY MURS

 

Via Official Charts Company