Home Infographic

Clearly, you love both Facebook and might be a bit scared of Snapchat, from what I’m seeing online at Twitter and Instagram (how’s that for an opening sentence about social media!) Lisa Hallgren of DPFOC.com takes a look at the pros, cons of using each platform, and giving you the impression that it’s still good to own Facebook stock.

face

Via here

From Business Insider:

At Business Insider’s IGNITION event last week, Business Insider CEO Henry Blodget detailed the future of the digital landscape, pointing out some important trends. For example, more than a quarter of all internet traffic now comes from smartphones and tablets — and two big internet properties are responsible for a huge amount of that traffic.

Based on data from a Sandvine report charted for us by BI Intelligence, Facebook and YouTube accounted for nearly 40% of all mobile web traffic in North America in September. Facebook accounted for 19% of that aggregate mobile traffic, YouTube was close behind with 18%, and the third largest share belonged to “general web traffic” through web browsers, at 11%. As BI Intelligence’s Mark Hoelzel points out, ads make up a big percentage of Facebook’s and YouTube’s mobile traffic, since autoplay video ads increase the mobile data demands on those social networks.

bii sai cotd mobile internet trafficBI Intelligence

 

Eight of the ten most followed Twitter accounts are musicians, with teen favourites Justin Bieber, Lady Gaga and Katy Perry claiming the top three spots, each boasting over 35m followers. The President of the United States, Barack Obama, is the first non-musician on the list, ranked fourth. But let’s look at defunct bands for a moment, and see who leads the way in followers.

livefeedsfromdeadbandsfinal

Band Aid’s “Do They Know It’s Christmas?” was written by Bob Geldof and Midge Ure in 1984 to raise money for relief of the 1983–85 famine in Ethiopia. The original version was produced by Midge Ure and released by Band Aid on November 28 1984. Geldof put together a group called Band Aid, consisting of 37 of the leading British and Irish musicians at the time.

The 1984 original became the biggest selling single in UK Singles Chart history, selling a million copies in the first week alone, and passing three million sales on the last day of 1984. It stayed at Number 1 for five weeks, becoming Christmas number one, and has sold 3.7 million copies domestically. Worldwide, the single had sold 11.8 million copies by 1989.

Following the release of “Do They Know It’s Christmas?” in December 1984 and record sales in aid of famine relief, Geldof then set his sights on staging a huge concert, 1985’s Live Aid, to raise further funds. The song was re-recorded in 1989 by Band Aid II and in 2004 by Band Aid 20, again raising funds for famine relief. The 2004 version of the song sold 1.17 million copies. The song was again re-recorded in 2014 by Band Aid 30, to raise funds for the 2014 Ebola crisis.

Check out the infographic marking the 30th anniversary of the original recording and illustrates the movers and shakers that made this monumental milestone in pop history possible.

Band-Aid-30th-Infographic-Blog1

hile the whole world is talking about Spotify, Pandora, iTunes and other digital music services, a long-forgotten medium has come back from near-extinction: the LP. In 2013, 6.1 million vinyl albums were sold in the United States, up from less than a million in 2005 and 2006. The same trend can be observed in the UK and in Germany, where LP sales have climbed to the highest levels since the early 1990s. Global vinyl sales amounted to $218 million in the past year and it’s all but certain that the vinyl comeback will continue in 2014.

There are several possible reasons for the sudden resurgence of the LP. Music aficionados have always valued the warm, organic sound of vinyl recordings but it may actually be the rise of digital music that contributed most to the uptick in vinyl sales: as great as services such as Spotify are in making music accessible, they also commoditized music to a certain degree and took away the pleasure of owning a physical album. To those who still prefer to own a tangible product, an LP may just add a little more value than a CD does (CD sales have been crushed lately). Plus, as many labels ship vinyl records with download codes, buyers get the best of both worlds when they purchase a vinyl album – they get the convenience of an MP3 download alongside the physical and acoustic pleasures of an LP.

It should probably be noted that vinyl sales still account for a small fraction of overall music revenues, but it’s nice to see that there’s still some life left in a medium that has been around for so many decades.

Infographic: Vinyl Comes Back From Near-Extinction | Statista
You will find more statistics at Statista

It’s no secret that vinyl is making a big comeback. In the U.K., the Official Charts Company show that almost 800,000 vinyl albums were sold in the first nine months of this year. This has already outstripped last year’s overall total of 780,674.

This infographic by U.K.’s Superfi dives into why interest in vinyl has come back, and what digital’s popularity means for the industry.

vinylrevival