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From the editors of Billboard: Like the rest of the country and the world, Billboard editors were horrified by the mass killing at Orlando’s Pulse nightclub on June 12, and by the murder of singer Christina Grimmie the night before. Both tragedies occurred where musicians and music fans gathered. And so faced with another gun-related tragedy, the staff organized this special “Open Letter to Congress” cover of Billboard.

With the help of leading gun-violence prevention group Everytown for Gun Safety, editors reached out to those we cover in the music industry, and asked for their support and their signatures to help seek a sane and safe end to gun violence. Within minutes, Joan Jett was the first to sign on. Lady Gaga shortly followed. Within hours, and then in a matter of just a few days, nearly 200 top artists and executives—pop stars (including Grimmie’s friend Selena Gomez), rappers, rock gods, legends, Broadway heroes, even two Beatles and Yoko Ono—lent their voices to the chorus of Americans looking to our political leaders for change. Billboard, artists and music-industry executives join so many members of the House and Senate this week proudly advocating for common-sense gun safety.

AN OPEN LETTER TO CONGRESS:

STOP GUN VIOLENCE NOW

As leading artists and executives in the music industry, we are adding our voices to the chorus of Americans demanding change.

Music always has been celebrated communally, on dancefloors and at concert halls. But this life-affirming ritual, like so many other daily experiences—going to school or church or work—now is threatened, because of gun violence in this country.

The one thing that connects the recent tragedies in Orlando is that it is far too easy for dangerous people to get their hands on guns.

We call on Congress to do more to prevent the gun violence that kills more than 90 Americans every day and injures hundreds more, including:

  • Require a background check for every gun sale
  • Block suspected terrorists from buying guns

Billboard and the undersigned implore you—the people who are elected to represent us—to close the deadly loopholes that put the lives of so many music fans, and all of us, at risk.

Sincerely,

Adam Lambert
Adam LeberPartner, Maverick
Adam LevinX Ambassadors
Akiva Schaeffer
Alan GilbertNY Philharmonic
Alanis Morissette
Alex PallThe Chainsmokers
Alicia Keys
Andrew Bird
Andy Samberg
Angel Coleman
Avery Lipman
Barbra Streisand
Beck
Bill KreutzmannDead & Company
Billy Joel
Bo KosterMy Morning Jacket
Bob WeirDead & Company
Bonnie Raitt
Boyd Muir
Brad DelsonLinkin Park
Bradford CobbPartner, Direct Management Group
Brandon CreedManager/The Creed Company
Brendon UriePanic at the Disco
Britney Spears
Butch Walker
Calvin Harris
Cam
Cameron StrangChairman/ CEO, Warner Bros. Records
Carl BroemelMy Morning Jacket
Carole King
Casey HarrisX Ambassadors
Charlie Puth
Charlie Walk
Cher
Chester BenningtonLinkin Park
Christina Aguilera
Christina Perri
Chromeo
Conan O’Brien
Courtney Love
Craig KallmanChairman/CEO, Atlantic Records Group
Cyndi Lauper
Dan McCarrollPresident, Warner Bros. Records
Daniel EkCo-Founder/CEO, Spotify
Daniel GlassFounder/President, Glassnote Entertainment Group/Insieme Music Publishing
Danny Bennett
Demi Lovato
Dina LaPoltFounder, LaPolt Law
Diplo
Doug Morris
Drew TaggartThe Chainsmokers
Eddie VedderPearl Jam
Elle King
Ellen DeGeneres
Elvis Costello
Emily RobisonDixie Chicks
Eric Hutchinson
Faisel Durrani
Fher OlveraManá
Glenn KotcheWilco
Gregory Porter
Halsey
Iggy Pop
Irving AzoffChairman/CEO, Azoff Madison Square Entertainment
Jack Antonoff
Jackson Browne
James Corden
James H. GosnellPresident and CEO, APA
Jason KuppermanAgent, Paradigm Talent Agency
Jason Mraz
Jay MarcianoCOO, AEG; Chairman & CEO, AEG Live
Jean-Michel Jarre
Jeff AmentPearl Jam
Jeff ChimentiDead & Company
Jeff TweedyWilco
Jeffrey Harleston
Jennifer Lopez
Jeremy ZimmerCEO/Co-Founder, United Talent Agency
Jim JamesMy Morning Jacket
Joan Jett
Jody Gerson
Joe HahnLinkin Park
Joe Jonas
John EspositoPresIdent/CEO, Warner Music Nashville
John Janick
John Mellencamp
John StirrattWilco
Jorge HernandezLos Tigres del Norte
Josh Groban
Julia Michaels
Julie GreenwaldChairman/COO, Atlantic Records Group
Justin Tranter
K.D. Lang
Kaskade
Katy Perry
Kelly Rowland
Kesha
Kevin LilesCo-Founder, 300 Entertainment
Kid Cudi
L.A. Reid
Lady Gaga
Lecrae
Lee DanielsDirector; CEO, Lee Daniels Entertainment
Lin-Manuel Miranda
Sir Lucian Grainge
Lyor CohenCEO/Founder, 300 Entertainment
Macklemore
Marc GeigerPartner/Head of Music, William Morris Endeavor
Mark PinkusPresident, Rhino Entertainment
Mark Ronson
Martie MaguireDixie Chicks
Martin Bandier
Martin ErlichmanManager, Barbra Streisand
Martin KirkupPartner, Direct Management Group
Matisyahu
Matt CameronPearl Jam
Meghan Trainor
Melissa Etheridge
Michael Bublé
Michael RapinoPresident/CEO, Live Nation
Michael Stipe
Michele Anthony
Michelle Jubelirer
Mickey HartDead & Company
Mikael JorgensenWilco
Mike CarenCEO, Artist Partners Group; Creative Officer, Warner Music Group
Mike D
Mike Dungan
Mike McCreadyPearl Jam
Mike ShinodaLinkin Park
Monte Lipman
Natalie MainesDixie Chicks
Nate Reuss
Nels ClineWilco
Nick Jonas
Nicky Jam
Pasquale RotellaCEO/Founder, Insomniac Events
Pat Monahan
Pat SansoneWilco
Patrick HallahanMy Morning Jacket
Paul McCartney
Pete Wentz
Peter Edge
Peter Tork
Phil McIntyreCEO/Founder, Philymack
Prince Royce
Pusha T
Questlove
Ricky Martin
Ringo Starr
Rivers Cuomo
Rob BourdonLinkin Park
Rob LightPartner/Managing Director/Head of Music, Creative Artists Agency
Rob Thomas
Roger GoldCo-Founder, 300 Entertainment
Rosanne Cash
Rufus Wainwright
Russell SimmonsHip Hop Mogul & Activist
Ryan LeslieProducer
Ryan Lewis
Sam GoresChairman/CEO, Paradigm Talent Agency
Sam HarrisX Ambassadors
Sara Bareilles
Scooter BraunFounder, SB Projects
Scott BorchettaPresident/CEO, Big Machine Label Group
Selena Gomez
Shakira
Sia
Stephen CooperCEO, Warner Music Group
Steve Barnett
Steve Bartels
Steve JensenPartner, Direct Management Group
Steve LevinePartner/Co-Head of Worldwide Concerts, ICM Partners
Stevie Nicks
Sting
Stone GossardPearl Jam
Stu BergenCEO, International and Global Commercial Services, Warner Music Group
Talib Kweli
Terence Blanchard
Thom Yorke
Tim WestergrenCEO, Pandora
Todd MoscowitzCo-Founder, 300 Entertainment
Tom BlankenshipMy Morning Jacket
Tom Corson
Tom WindishPresident, The Windish Agency
Tony Bennett
Tori Amos
Trent Reznor
Troye Sivan
Vic Mensa
Wayne Coyne
Yoko Ono
Zayn Malik

Ralph Stanley, a patriarch of Appalachian music who with his brother Carter helped expand and popularize the genre that became known as bluegrass, died Thursday from difficulties with skin cancer. He was 89.

Stanley was born and raised in southwest Virginia, a land of coal mines and deep forests where he and his brother formed the Stanley Brothers and their Clinch Mountain Boys in 1946. Their father would sing them old traditional songs like “Man of Constant Sorrow,” while their mother, a banjo player, taught them the old-time clawhammer style, in which the player’s fingers strike downward at the strings in a rhythmic style.

Heavily influenced by Grand Ole Opry star Bill Monroe, the brothers fused Monroe’s rapid rhythms with the mountain folk songs from groups such as the Carter Family, who hailed from this same rocky corner of Virginia.

The Stanleys created a distinctive three-part harmony that combined the lead vocal of Carter with Ralph’s tenor and an even higher part sung by bandmate Pee Wee Lambert. Carter’s romantic songwriting professed a deep passion for the rural landscape, but also reflected on lonesomeness and personal losses.

Songs like “The Lonesome River,” uses the imagery of the water to evoke the loss of a lover, and “White Dove,” describes the mourning and suffering after the death of a mother and father. In 1951, they popularized “Man of Constant Sorrow,” which was also later recorded by Bob Dylan in the ’60s.

The brothers were swept into the burgeoning folk movement and they toured the country playing folk and bluegrass festivals during the ’60s, including the Newport Folk Festival in 1959 and 1964.

But when Carter died of liver disease in 1966, Ralph wasn’t sure he could continue. His brother had been the main songwriter, lead singer and front man, and Ralph, by his own account, was withdrawn and shy, although he had overcome some of his early reticence.

“Within weeks of his passing, I got phone calls and letters and telegrams and they all said don’t quit. They said, ‘We’ve always been behind you and Carter, but now we’ll be behind you even more because we know you’ll need us,'” Stanley told The Associated Press in 2006.

After Carter’s death, Ralph drew even deeper from his Appalachian roots, adopting the a cappella singing style of the Primitive Baptist church where he was raised. He reformed the Clinch Mountain Boys band to include Ray Cline, vocalist Larry Sparks and Melvin Goins. He would change the lineup of the band over the years, later including Jack Cooke, and mentored younger artists like Keith Whitley and Ricky Skaggs, who also performed with him.

Dylan and Grateful Dead’s Jerry Garcia praised his work and, in the case of Dylan, joined him for a remake of the Stanley Brothers’ “Lonesome River” in 1997.

He was given an honorary doctorate of music from Lincoln Memorial University in Harrogate, Tennessee, in 1976, and he was often introduced as “Dr. Ralph Stanley.” He performed at the inaugurations of U.S. Presidents Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton, was given a “Living Legends” medal from the Library of Congress and a National Medal of Arts presented by the National Endowment for the Arts and President George W. Bush. He became a member of the Grand Ole Opry in 2000.

But at age 73, he was introduced to a new generation of fans in 2000 due to his chilling a cappella dirge “O Death” from the hit Coen Brothers’ “O Brother, Where Art Thou?” movie soundtrack. The album was a runaway hit, topping the Billboard 200 chart, as well as the country albums and soundtrack charts, and sold millions of copies.

He won a Grammy for best male country vocal performance in 2002 — beating out Tim McGraw, Ryan Adams, Willie Nelson, Johnny Cash and Lyle Lovett — and was the focus of a successful tour and documentary inspired by the soundtrack. The soundtrack, produced by T Bone Burnett, also won a Grammy for album of the year. The following year he and Jim Lauderdale would win a Grammy for best bluegrass album for “Lost in the Lonesome Pines.”

He said in an interview with The Associated Press in 2002 that younger people were coming to see his shows and hear his “old time music,” and was enjoying the belated recognition.

“I wish it had come 25 years sooner,” he said. “I am still enjoying it, but I would have had longer to enjoy it.”

Despite health problems, he continued to record and tour into his 80s, often performing with his son Ralph Stanley II on guitar and his grandson Nathan on mandolin.

Stanley was born in Big Spraddle, Virginia and lived in Sandy Ridge outside of Coeburn, Virginia. His mother was Lucy Jane Smith Stanley and his father was Lee Stanley. He is survived by his wife Jimmie Stanley – they were to celebrate their 48th wedding anniversary on July 2nd. He is also survived by his children: Lisa Stanley Marshall, Tonya Armes Stanley and Ralph Stanley II; His grandchildren: Nathan Stanley, Amber Meade Stanley, Evan Stout, Ashley Marshall, Alexis Marshall, Taylor Stanley, and Ralph Stanley III; and great grandchild Mckenzie Stanley. Memorial service details are pending and will be announced shortly.

A full seven months since its retail release on Nov. 20, Adele’s 25 is finally headed to streaming services. Reps for Spotify, Apple Music, Amazon Prime and Tidal all confirmed that the singer’s record-breaking third album will be available for streaming at midnight tonight (June 23).

The move is the first time that the full album will be available for streaming across any platform; to date, just the singles “Hello,” “Send My Love (To Your New Lover)” and “When We Were Young” have been available on Spotify, Apple Music and Tidal. Her previous two albums, 2011’s 21 and 2008’s 19, are available for streaming now, though 21 was also withheld from streaming services upon its initial release.

The decision is an about-face for the famously streaming-shy Adele, who called streaming music “a bit disposable” in a December 2015 TIME cover story. “I know that streaming music is the future, but it’s not the only way to consume music,” she continued in the interview. “I can’t pledge allegiance to something that I don’t know how I feel about yet.”

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After the Rolling Stones‘ career-spanning museum exhibit Exhibitionism closes in London, it’s headed to New York.

The Stones and Exhibitionism curator Ileen Gallagher revealed Tuesday that the exhibit – featuring stage clothing, classic album artwork, vintage gear, photography, stage designs, personal diaries, behind-the-scenes footage, a recreation of the band’s first apartment and more memorabilia – will set up shop at the West Village’s Industria Superstudio, the first stop on what’s being billed as “the largest touring experience of its kind ever to be staged.”

Tickets for New York will go on sale to the general public in September. Register at the Exhibitionism site to be among the first notified of the tickets’ availability.

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Returning for its eighth year this September, the Canadian Music Café capitalizes on the international attention placed on Toronto during the Toronto International Film Festival® to bring the very best in new Canadian music to the ears of film and television music supervisors and the filmed media community gathering at TIFF.

With alumni such as City and Colour, Martha Wainwright, Scott Helman, Donovan Woods, Dear Rouge, Terra Lightfoot and Arkells, the Canadian Music Café is a hub for rising Canadian talent, facilitating connections that lead to song placements in films, television programs and commercials, including Grey’s Anatomy, Degrassi, Castle, Beauty and The Beast, Ugly Betty, The L Word and more.

The 2016 edition of the Canadian Music Café takes place September 12 and 13 in the heart of downtown Toronto (venue to be announced soon). Canadian artists are encouraged to apply for showcase consideration here. Applications will be accepted from June 15 at 12 PM (EST) until June 29 at 11:59 pm (EST) and the 10 selected artists will be notified by the end of July.

Proceeds from the $25 submission fee will be donated to the Unison Benevolent Fund and each performing act will be compensated $750 for their showcase.

The Canadian Music Café is a joint initiative produced by the Canadian Music Publishers Association (CMPA) and the Canadian Independent Music Association (CIMA) whose mandates are to support and advocate for the Canadian music publishers and the Canadian independent music community respectively. CMPA and CIMA graciously acknowledge that the 2016 Canadian Music Café is made possible with the support of the Ontario Media Development Corporation (OMDC) and the Government of Canada’s Department of Heritage.

Spotify is the first music-streaming service to reach 100 million monthly active users, the company confirmed to The Telegraph today. The announcement comes three months after the service reached 30 million paid subscribers and raised $1 billion in debt financing for its fight against Apple Music.

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Twitter has Periscope. Amazon has Twitch. Google has YouTube’s live streaming. And Facebook has Facebook Live. Now, Tumblr is getting into live video, too. The company is preparing to launch a new live video feature on its service, beginning tomorrow, which will introduce a series of live broadcasts as well as a user-facing feature that could compete with Facebook Live, among other things.

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On June 22 in Toronto, you can, in fact, sit with us.

Written by the incomparable Tina Fey, Mean Girlsis a funny, clever satire of high school cliques, starring Lindsay Lohan and Ontario’s own Rachel McAdams.

See La Lohan in her career defining tour de force performance, as we so desperately want to remember her. (Those freckles!) Unleash your inner Regina, Gretchen or Karen and bring your fellow Plastics for a très cute movie date under the stars on the pier.

Join TIFF for an online movie party on an interactive platform, featuring some special guests! Connect at synaptop.com via video and text with stars and fellow fans, from wherever you are.

The screening will be live-commentated by Mean Girls’ star and gay icon Daniel Franzese (of Mean Girls and HBO’s Looking).

Multiplatinum-band Simple Plan have announced a 6-date Canadian tour that will see them play arenas this November in London, ON; Toronto; Ottawa; Quebec City; Halifax; and Montreal.

Fan club members will have access to tickets starting tomorrow. Tickets go on sale to the public on Thursday in Quebec City and Montreal, and Friday for the other four dates. Opening each date will be pop-punkers All Time Low and American band PVRIS.

“We are extremely excited to once again have the privilege to headline a huge arena tour back at home in Canada,” says the band. “All the love and support we get from our Canadian fans is very special to us and we absolutely love playing shows for them. We’re also really stoked to bring along All-Time Low and PVRIS with us, two amazing bands that we love and that we know our fans will be thrilled about. These shows are gonna be a blast and we already can’t wait for November!”

The tour is in support of the band’s fifth studio album Taking One For The Team. Simple Plan will also be touring all over Canada this summer with select festival dates (full list below), as well as joining Blink-182 and The Used at the MTS Centre in Winnipeg on July 7.

Last week, Alternative Press named Simple Plan one of the 10 most influential bands in pop punk. “While the album titles have gotten a tad more mature, their music still sounds made for every summer vacation,” writes the magazine. “Simple Plan aren’t afraid to take risks and still keep coming out with awesome pop-influence albums.”

The band recently released a video for their latest single, “Singing In The Rain,” that takes the band back to 1964. The video is streaming on the band’s YouTube channel here: https://youtu.be/bSO6ikrxSqk.

“The video for “Singing In The Rain” is a love letter to one of our favourite movies of all time, ‘That Thing You Do.’ It’s about the exhilarating power that 3 chords, a drum beat and a catchy melody can have on the lives of the people who create it. The video takes you on the magical journey from rehearsing in a garage to playing stadiums and topping the charts. and the roller-coaster ride that is the music industry: both exhilarating and extraordinary, heartbreaking and bittersweet,” says the band.

Taking One For The Team album also features  “Boom,” “Opinion Overload,” “Farewell (feat. Jordan Pundik),” “Perfectly Perfect,” and “I Don’t Wanna Go To Bed (feat. Nelly).”

Canadian summer tour dates:

JULY 7                    WINNIPEG                            MTS Centre (With Blink 182)
JULY 17                 CALGARY                              Stampede
JULY 30                 EDMONTON                        K-Days
JULY 31                 TUMBER RIDGE, BC          Grizfest
AUGUST 6             LEWISPORTE, NL                                Mussel Bed Soiree
AUGUST 11          SASKATOON                         Saskatoon Exhibition
AUGUST 13          RAWDON, QC                      Parc de la Plage
AUGUST 19          ACTON VALE, QC                Le Show De La Rentree
AUGUST 20          SMOOTH ROCK FALLS, ON Smooth Truck Fest
AUGUST 25          VANCOUVER                       PNE

Fall arena tour:

NOVEMBER 17    LONDON, ON                       Budweiser Gardens
NOVEMBER 18    TORONTO                             Air Canada Centre
NOVEMBER 19    OTTAWA                               TD Place Arena
NOVEMBER 21    QUEBEC CITY                      Videotron Centre
NOVEMBER 22    HALIFAX                                Scotiabank Metro Centre
NOVEMBER 23    MONTREAL                          Bell Centre (PVRIS only/Main Support TBA)

Across the country, defense attorneys routinely advertise their services to festival-goers who end up in police custody. There’s the Johnson Law Group, for example, which claims on its website to be “recognized by many as the “Summer Camp Music Festival Law Firm,” referring to an event in Chillicothe, Ill. There’s Lawyers for Burners, a Nevada group that has been defending Burning Man participants for years. And in Connecticut, where Gathering of the Vibes is held, lawyer Jay Ruane attends the festival wearing a shirt that reads “Constitution Enforcement Agent” and hands out his business cards.

Sometimes, lawyers promoting their availability run afoul of festival promoters. That was the case with Stephanie Arrache, a criminal defense lawyer in Southern California, who practices just outside Indio, where the Coachella and StageCoach festivals are held. She estimates half of her clientele are people arrested at the local festivals, some of whom find her through her website, TheMusicFestivalLawyer.com. This year, Arrache bought Facebook ads using hashtags associated with Coachella and Stagecoach. Shortly afterward, she said, she received a cease-and-desist letter from the festival’s organizers, AEG Live, threatening to sue and claiming the event’s hashtags had been copyrighted.

One lawyer and festival enthusiast has taken a different approach. Cameron Bowman is a former prosecutor turned criminal defense attorney who has made it his mission to educate attendees about their rights. He doesn’t market himself to people arrested at these gatherings, but rather holds educational workshops where participants can test their knowledge of Constitutional Rights and festival law, including a segment entitled: “Do you even 4th Amendment, Bro?”

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