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Music Industry

CANADIAN MUSIC WEEK announces the next wave of artists for the 2017 edition of the festival. Newly added performers include double platinum rock icon MELISSA ETHERIDGE, Toronto’s indie-rock mainstays HOLLERADO, along with the city’s critically acclaimed rising stars CHARLOTTE DAY WILSONWEAVES and GREYS, Montreal’s electronic-punk outfit DUCHESS SAYS, and the new psychedelic-jazz collaboration from composer / producer Toro Y Moi, CHAZ BUNDICK MEETS MATTSON 2. The SiriusXM House will land at The Great Hall, packed with two nights of music including a special headlining set on Saturday with Canadian Country act HIGH VALLEY.
Please see below for full list of new additions and stay tuned for further updates. This year’s festival is set to take place April 18 – 23 at participating venues across downtown Toronto.

Next Wave of Artists:
Charlotte Day Wilson (*Co-presented with Live Nation, tickets available here).
Chaz Bundick Meets Mattson 2
Duchess Says
Flasher
Freak Heat Waves
Greys
High Valley
Hoan
Hollerado
Julia Jacklin
Madeline Merlo
Melissa Etheridge
River Town Saints
Weaves

Ticket Info – Early bird pricing on CMW passes until January 26 here.

Investment by new digital services like Spotify, Sky, Amazon, Apple Music and Google has resulted in sales of music, video and games running £1bn ahead of where they were just four years ago, according to data compiled by the Entertainment Retailers Association (ERA).

Preliminary figures from ERA indicate that booming digital services helped the music, video and games markets achieve new all-time record sales of £6.3bn in 2016, up 3% on the previous year – and over £1bn more than they were as recently as 2012.

That 3% growth is even more remarkable since it comes in comparison with 2015, which was a 53-week year.

For the first time in 2016 the video market became a majority (58%) digital business with revenues from downloads and subscription services now exceeding those of DVD and Blu-ray discs.

Digital services account for 57% of music revenues and 74% of the games market.

ERA CEO Kim Bayley said, “The music, video and games industries were understandably nervous about the advent of new digital services, but these figures provide resounding evidence of the benefits of our members’ investment in innovation. To have added over £1bn in new revenues in just four years is an incredible achievement. To put it another way, take away today’s digital services and the entertainment market would be barely a third the size it is today.”

ERA’s market figures provide a definitive overview of the UK entertainment market, aggregating data from respected market analysts including the Official Charts Company, GfK and IHS. Preliminary numbers will be updated and confirmed with the publication of the ERA Yearbook in March 2016.

Physical remains a £2.2bn business

Physical formats of music, video and games product declined by 15% in aggregate in 2016, but some physical formats continue to flourish. Sales of handheld games software grew 21.3% to £48.8m, while vinyl records continued their sustained revival, up 56.4% to £65.6m.

“Physical entertainment retailing is clearly off its peak,” said Bayley, “but it is still a £2.2bn market. The growth of vinyl in particular shows that physical formats can flourish if they offer distinctive benefits. The strength of the DVD and CD formats over the Christmas period shows that physical still dominates when it comes to gifting, for instance.”
Music: Entertainment’s fastest-growing sector

Music revenues grew by 4.6% in 2016, well ahead of video (up 2.2%) and games (up 2.9%) powered by a huge 65% rise in music subscription revenues driven by services such as Spotify, Apple Music, Amazon and Deezer.

The biggest decline was suffered by downloads (down 26.8% overall). After a relatively resilient 2015 when sales declined just 3.7%, CD revenues fell by 13% in 2016.

The biggest-selling album of the year was Now That’s What I Call Music 95 with sales of 908,500 units.

Americans consume more music than ever. That’s according to Nielsen’s 2016 U.S. Music report, published last week. Fueled by a further increase in music streaming, overall album consumption (measured in album sales and equivalent digital song downloads and streams) increased by 3.1 percent compared to the previous year.

While CD and digital album sales decreased by 16 and 20 percent, respectively, the number of on-demand music streams increased to 432 billion, up nearly 40 percent since 2015. While nearly 80 percent of music consumption now happens digitally, the most analog of formats continues its surprising comeback. LP sales were up 10 percent in 2016 as vinyl lovers bought 13.1 million albums.

This chart shows how music consumption in the United States has changed in 2016 compared to the previous year.

Infographic: The Rise of Music Streaming Continues | Statista
You will find more statistics at Statista

Paul McCartney on never feeling confident as a songwriter:

“There is no sort of point you just think, ‘Okay, now I can do it, I’ll just sit down and do it.’ It’s a little more fluid than that. You talk to people who make records or albums and you always go into the studio thinking, ‘Oh, well I know this! I’ve got a lot of stuff down, you know, I write.’ And then you realize that you’re doing it all over again you’re starting from square one again. You’ve never got it down. It’s this fluid thing, music. I kind of like that. I wouldn’t like to be blasé or think, ‘Oh you know I know how to do this.’ In fact I teach a class at a the Liverpool Institute High School for Boys — I do a little songwriting class with the students — and nearly always the first thing I go in and say [is], ‘I don’t know how to do this. You would think I do, but it’s not one of these things you ever know how to do. You know I can say to you: Select the key. We will now select a rhythm. Now make a melody. Now think of some great words,’ That’s not really the answer.”

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Why is it, do you think, you have been allowed to tour and grow musically without being pigeonholed into being a nostalgia act?

Manson: I think a lot of bands get really attached to their early success, and they don’t want to let go of that achievement. For me and the boys in Garbage, we have let go of everything in the past. We’ve accepted where our career has gone and we’re not trying to remind people that we once were hugely successful. We have just moved through our career and not really looked back. And some of that is fearlessness and some of that is about freedom. You can get really imprisoned by your early success and a lot of artists make the mistake of holding on to what they once were instead of just being willing to jump into whatever new phase awaits them.

What freed you up enough to say we don’t care if we ever have another “Stupid Girl”?

Manson: For me, it was very strange because it actually had nothing to do with music. It was an incredible teacher I studied acting with who really taught me about what it means to be a creative person in the world. I’d done that TV show [Terminator: Sarah Connor Chronicles], and I was on hiatus with the band. And I went and studied with this teacher [Sarah Chatten], and I just went to school with her and became a student of her. She basically taught me what it meant to be creative, curious and brave from a creative standpoint. That changed my entire view of my career and what it means to be a musician. I also had this moment, I went to Tate Gallery in London, and I saw a Louise Bourgeois retrospective and at the time I think Louise Bourgeois was something like 92 years old, and I saw this body of work this formidable lady had created throughout her life and I was like, “Oh, I don’t actually have to be an entertainer, I don’t actually have to be on Top Of The Pops, I don’t have to be the most popular artist out there. I just have to concentrate on being an artist and trying to concentrate on doing good work and the rest is in the hands of the gods and it’s out of my control.” And once I realized that I broke all the chains that had been clamped on me.

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Great Big Story interviewed DJ Cipha Sounds, the man who popularized the air horn sound effect in hip-hop music by using it into his radio show.

Born on a B-side of a Bob Marley and the Wailers record, the air horn sound has been associated with reggae and Jamaican dancehall music since the 1960s. What was once a staple of the club scene in Jamaica has now become a global hip-hop phenomenon, thanks primarily to Luis Diaz aka Cipha Sounds. The DJ was kind enough to share the story behind the massive, attention-grabbing sound.

The Blues Foundation is pleased to announce the nominations for its annual Blues Music Awards, which the international organization will present on Thursday, May 11, 2017 at the Cook Convention Center in downtown Memphis, Tennessee. Universally recognized as the highest accolade afforded blues musicians, The Blues Music Awards upholds its rich cultural tradition by honoring the past year’s superior achievements in blues performance, songwriting, and recording. This annual ceremony represents the premier event for blues professionals, musicians, and fans around the globe.

Sugar Ray Norcia, individually, and collectively with his band, The Bluetones, received the most nominations with seven, including B.B. King Entertainer Award, Best Song, Best Album and Best Band. The total reaches ten with the inclusion of his Bluetones bandmates Monster Mike Welch (Instrumentalist-Guitar), Michael “Mudcat” Ward (Instrumentalist-Bass) and Anthony Geraci (Pinetop Perkins Piano Player). Chicago-based guitarist Toronzo Cannon garnered four nominations and he faces off against Norcia in both the Best Song and Best Album categories. Best Album probably ranks as the most competitive category, with Norcia and Cannon battling Bobby Rush, Kenny Neal, William Bell and the Nick Moss Band, who all have three nominations.

Several nominees will be defending their titles won at last year’s Blues Music Awards. Instrumentalist-Harmonica winner Kim Wilson is one of this year’s nominees, and Cedric Burnside might again claim the Instrumentalist-Drums crown. Shemekia Copeland and Bettye LaVette also return to the categories they won last year (Contemporary Blues Female Artist and Soul Blues Female Artist, respectively), while 2016’s Acoustic Artist winner, Doug MacLeod, is one of this year’s contenders too.

The Awards also honor the next generation of blues performers with the Best Emerging Artist Album category. In fact, two Emerging Artist nominees also are contenders for a second award. Detroit native Thornetta Davis’s “I Gotta Sang the Blues” is up for Best Song, while Terrie Odabi is competing against the likes of Bettye LaVette and Mavis Staples to be named Soul Blues Female Artist.

A ballot will soon be sent to all Blues Foundation members, as they have the privilege of deciding which nominees will actually take home a Blues Music Award in May. Anyone interested in casting a vote to decide this year’s winners may receive a ballot by joining or renewing their membership with The Blues Foundation at any time up to February 28, 2017.

The Blues Music Awards ceremony annually proves to be one of the year’s best shows. Not only does almost every nominee attend, but they also perform, creating a lineup featuring the best of the best in blues all in one evening.

Major funding is provided by ArtsMemphis and the Tennessee Arts Commission.  The 38th Blues Music Awards are also sponsored by BMI, GET and I-55 Productions, Legendary Rhythm & Blues Cruise, Memphis Convention and Visitors Bureau, the Sierra Nevada Brewing Company and Sony/Legacy.

38th Blues Music Award Nominees

Acoustic Album
Doug MacLeod – Live in Europe
Eric Bibb – The Happiest Man in the World
Fiona Boyes – Professin’ the Blues
Jimmy “Duck” Holmes – Live at Briggs Farm
John Long – Stand Your Ground
Luther Dickinson – Blues and Ballads (A Folksinger’s Songbook) Vol I and II

Acoustic Artist
Doug MacLeod
Eric Bibb
Fiona Boyes
Jimmy “Duck” Holmes
Luther Dickinson

Album
Bobby Rush – Porcupine Meat
Kenny Neal – Bloodline
Nick Moss Band – From the Root to the Fruit
Sugar Ray & the Bluetones – Seeing is Believing
Toronzo Cannon – The Chicago Way
William Bell – This Is Where I Live

Band
Golden State Lone Star Blues Revue
Lil’ Ed & The Blues Imperials
Nick Moss Band
Sugar Ray and the Bluetones
Tedeschi Trucks Band

B.B. King Entertainer
Joe Bonamassa
John Nemeth
Lil’ Ed Williams
Sugar Ray Norcia
Sugaray Rayford

Best Emerging Artist Album
Corey Dennison Band – Corey Dennison
Guy King – Truth
Jonn Del Toro Richardson – Tengo Blues
Terrie Odabi – My Blue Soul
Thornetta Davis – Honest Woman

Contemporary Blues Album
Al Basile – Mid Century Modern
Kenny Neal – Bloodline
Nick Moss Band – From the Root to the Fruit
The Record Company – Give It Back To You
Toronzo Cannon – The Chicago Way

Contemporary Blues Female Artist
Alexis P Suter
Ana Popovic
Janiva Magness
Shemekia Copeland
Susan Tedeschi

Contemporary Blues Male Artist
Albert Castiglia
Kenny Neal
Mike Zito
Sugaray Rayford
Toronzo Cannon

Historical Album
Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup, A Music Man Like Nobody Ever Saw, Bear Family Records
B.B. King, More B.B. King: Here’s One You Haven’t Heard, Ace Records
Bobby Rush, Chicken Heads: A 50-Year History of Bobby Rush, Omnivore Recordings
Michael Burks, I’m A Bluesman, Iron Man Records
Pinetop Perkins & Jimmy Rogers, Genuine Blues Legends, Elrob Records

Instrumentalist-Bass
Biscuit Miller
Bob Stroger
Michael “Mudcat” Ward
Patrick Rynn
R W Grigsby

Instrumentalist-Drums
Cedric Burnside
Jimi Bott
June Core
Tom Hambridge
Tony Braunagel

Instrumentalist-Guitar
Bob Margolin
Joe Bonamassa
Kid Andersen
Monster Mike Welch
Ronnie Earl

Instrumentalist-Harmonica
Dennis Gruenling
Jason Ricci
Kim Wilson
Mark Hummel
Sugar Ray Norcia

Instrumentalist-Horn
Al Basile
Nancy Wright
Sax Gordon Beadle
Terry Hanck
Vanessa Collier

Koko Taylor Award (Traditional Blues Female Artist)
Annika Chambers
Diunna Greenleaf
Inetta Visor
Shaun Murphy
Trudy Lynn

Pinetop Perkins Piano Player
Anthony Geraci
Barrelhouse Chuck
Henry Gray
Jim Pugh
Victor Wainwright

Rock Blues Album
Albert Castiglia – Big Dog
Mike Zito – Keep Coming Back
Moreland & Arbuckle – Promised Land or Bust
Tedeschi Trucks Band – Let Me Get By
Walter Trout – Alive in Amsterdam

Song
“Blues Immigrant” written by Matthew Skoller & Vincent Bucher and performed by Matthew Skoller on Blues Immigrant
“I Gotta Sang The Blues” written and performed by Thornetta Davis on Honest Woman
“Seeing Is Believing” written by Ray Norcia and performed by Sugar Ray & The Bluetones on Seeing Is Believing
“Walk A Mile In My Blues” written by David Duncan, Curtis Salgado & Mike Finigan and performed by Curtis Salgado on The Beautiful Lowdown
“Walk it Off” written and performed by Toronzo Cannon on The Chicago Way

Soul Blues Album
Bobby Rush – Porcupine Meat
Curtis Salgado – The Beautiful Lowdown
Johnny Rawls – Tiger in a Cage
Wee Willie Walker – Live! Notodden Blues Festival
William Bell – This Is Where I Live

Soul Blues Female Artist
Bettye Lavette
Lara Price
Mavis Staples
Terrie Odabi
Vaneese Thomas

Soul Blues Male Artist
Bobby Rush
Curtis Salgado
Johnny Rawls
Wee Willie Walker
William Bell

Traditional Blues Album
Big Jon Atkinson & Bob Corritore – House Party at Big Jon’s
Bob Margolin – My Road
Golden State Lone Star Blues Revue – Golden State Lone Star Blues Revue
Lurrie Bell – Can’t Shake This Feeling
Sugar Ray & the Bluetones – Seeing is Believing

Traditional Blues Male Artist
Bob Margolin
John Primer
Lil’ Ed Williams
Lurrie Bell
Sugar Ray Norcia

Nominations for the 2017 Canadian Music and Broadcast Industry Awards are now open.

The Awards annually celebrate Industry trailblazers and outstanding professionals. To be considered for the awards, companies are encouraged to submit their nominations online. The deadline for nomination submissions are January 31st, and you can submit nominations here.

The Industry Wide Voting Window Opens on Feb. 26 and runs to March 8. Nominees will be posted on the Canadian Music and Broadcast Industry Awards website to be voted on by the industry.

The awards will be held on April 20 at The Grand Ballroom of The Sheraton Centre in Toronto. A portion of the proceeds from awards night will be donated to the Unison Benevolent Fund.

“If every ticket in the venue ‘sells out’ at the face value printed on the ticket, that wouldn’t be enough to pay the artist what they are contractually guaranteed by the promoter for the performance. How does the promoter make up the difference? You guessed it: by selling some of the best seats directly in the secondary market, so that artists don’t get flack from you for pricing them high right out of the gate. That means the artist is either directly complicit, or that the artist is taking a massive check for the performance while looking the other way. Goddammit, right?” Nathan Hubbard (who used to be the CEO of Ticketmaster) explains why you can never get good tickets to a major event.

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