Home Isolated Tracks

Here’s what you need for this chilly day – 3 absolute classics from The Beach Boys’ and their isolated vocals for you to blow your mind.

California Girls: Listen for a few spots of imperfect harmonies. That would have never pass if it was released today, which makes it all the more brilliant.

Wouldn’t It Be Nice?: Brian Wilson described the song as “what children everywhere go through … wouldn’t it be nice if we were older, or could run away and get married”.

Sloop John B: The Kingston Trio’s 1958 recording of “The John B. Sails” recorded under the title “The Wreck of the John B” was the direct influence on The Beach Boys’ version.

“We Are the Champions” by Queen for their 1977 album News of the World, isn’t just one of the band’s most famous and popular songs, it’s among music’s most recognisable anthems.

The song was a worldwide success, reaching number two in the UK Singles Chart, and number four on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States. In 2009, “We Are the Champions” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame, and was voted the world’s favourite song in a 2005 Sony Ericsson world music poll. In 2011, a team of scientific researchers concluded that the song was the catchiest in the history of popular music.

VOCAL only (Freddie Mercury):

GUITARS only (Brian May):

DRUMS  only (Roger Taylor):

VOCAL (Mercury), PIANO (Mercury), RHYTHM GUITAR (May) only:

Written by June Carter Cash and Merle Kilgore and popularized by Johnny Cash, “Ring of Fire” appears on Cash’s 1963 album, Ring of Fire: The Best of Johnny Cash. The song was originally recorded by June’s sister, Anita Carter, on her Mercury Records album Folk Songs Old and New (1963) as “(Love’s) Ring of Fire”. “Ring of Fire” ranked No. 4 on CMT’s 100 Greatest Songs in Country Music in 2003 and #87 on Rolling Stone’s list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

The song was recorded on March 25, 1963, and became the biggest hit of Johnny Cash’s career, staying at number one on the charts for seven weeks. It was certified Gold on January 21, 2010 by the R.I.A.A. and has also sold over 1.2 million digital downloads.

Although “Ring of Fire” sounds somewhat ominous, the term refers to falling in love – which is what June Carter was experiencing with Johnny Cash at the time. Some sources claim that Carter had seen the phrase “Love is like a burning ring of fire,” underlined in one of her uncle A. P. Carter’s Elizabethan books of poetry. She worked with Kilgore on writing a song inspired by this phrase as she had seen her uncle do in the past. She had written: “There is no way to be in that kind of hell, no way to extinguish a flame that burns, burns, burns”.

Fun Fact: After the Carpenters became successful in the early 1970s, she and her brother bought two apartment buildings in Downey as a financial investment. Formerly named the “Geneva”, the two complexes were renamed “Only Just Begun” and “Close to You” in honor of the duo’s first smash hits. The apartment buildings are located at 8353 and 8356 (respectively) 5th Street, Downey, California. In 1976 Carpenter bought two Century City apartments, gutted them, and turned them into one condominium. Located at 2222 Avenue of the Stars, the doorbell chimed the first six notes of “We’ve Only Just Begun”.

 
Below, “Ticket to Ride” vocals and drums:

 


“Superstar” vocals, bass and drums:

 


“Yesterday Once More” vocals and bass:

 


“Goodbye To Love” vocals, bass and drums:

 


“Rainy Days And Mondays” vocals, bass and drums:

 


“For All We Know” vocals, bass and drums:

 

 

Released originally prior to their first album as a single, “Pumped Up Kicks” was the massive hit from Foster The People’s 2011 debut release Torches. The album rose to #8 on the Billboard 200 Album charts and garnered a Grammy Award nomination for Best Alternative Music Album. While the album included production from such notables as Paul Epworth (who also worked with Adele), Greg Kurstin, Rich Costey, and Tony Hoffer, it was group leader Mark Foster who produced this track, which was actually the demo version. One of the most misunderstood songs of the last 20 years, the lyrics to “Pumped Up Kicks” are written from the perspective of a troubled and delusional youth with homicidal thoughts. The lines in the chorus warn potential victims to “outrun my gun” and that they “better run, better run, faster than my bullet.” Foster said in a statement to CNN.com, “I wrote ‘Pumped Up Kicks’ when I began to read about the growing trend in teenage mental illness. I wanted to understand the psychology behind it because it was foreign to me. It was terrifying how mental illness among youth had skyrocketed in the last decade. I was scared to see where the pattern was headed if we didn’t start changing the way we were bringing up the next generation.” In writing the song, Foster wanted to “get inside the head of an isolated, psychotic kid” and “bring awareness” to the issue of gun violence amongst youth, which he feels is an epidemic perpetuated by “lack of family, lack of love, and isolation.” The song’s title refers to shoes that the narrator’s peers wear as a status symbol.

For play on the television channels MTV and MTVu, the words “gun” and “bullet” were removed from the song’s chorus. Foster believes many have misinterpreted the song’s meaning, and have written letters to his record label and called radio stations to complain. He explained, “The song is not about condoning violence at all. It’s the complete opposite. The song is an amazing platform to have a conversation with your kids about something that shouldn’t be ignored, to talk about it in a loving way.”

Originally inspired by a police brutality incident witnessed by Renaldo “Obie” Benson, “What’s Goin’ On” was composed by Benson, Al Cleveland and Gaye and produced by Gaye himself. Bassist James Jamerson was pulled into the session after Gaye located him playing with a band at a local bar. Respected Motown arranger and conductor David Van De Pitte said later to Ben Edmonds that Jamerson “always kept a bottle of [the Greek spirit] Metaxa in his bass case. He could really put that stuff away, and then sit down and still be able to play. His tolerance was incredible. It took a hell a lot to get him smashed.” The night Jamerson entered the studio to record the bass lines to the song, Jamerson couldn’t sit properly in his seat and, according to one of the members of the Funk Brothers, laid on the floor playing his bass riffs.

“Shiver” is a track off Coldplay’s debut album, Parachutes, released in 2000. The track followed “Yellow” as the second single released and rose to #35 on the UK Singles chart and #26 on the Billboard Alternative Songs chart. The album was recorded at Matrix and Wessex in London, Parr Street in Liverpool and Rockfield Studios in Rockfield, UK and was produced by Ken Nelson and Coldplay.

Chris Martin admitted that “Shiver” was written for a specific woman, but hasn’t revealed a specific name. Martin actually wrote the song in a “glum” day, when he felt he would never find the right woman for him. He described it as something of a “stalking song”, admitting he wrote it for a specific woman. In addition, Martin wrote the song while listening to music of Jeff Buckley, and had claimed it is their “most blatant rip-off song”.

Written by Lorde in half an hour then refined with Joel Little, the single’s producer, “Royals” was intended as a “response to everything that’s on pop radio”, with lyrics that revolve around aspirationalism, counterpointing popular artists’ luxurious lifestyles.The track and lyrics largely received critical acclaim from international media, with widespread praise of both production and message. The eventual commercial success of “Royals” exceeded most expectations: occupying the United States Billboard Hot 100 chart’s top spot for nine consecutive weeks, with Lorde the first New Zealander solo act to top that chart. In the US, the single has been certified seven times platinum by RIAA and has topped mainstream charts in New Zealand, Canada, Ireland and the United Kingdom – plus reaching the top five in Australia and Switzerland.

The Who’s Pinball Wizard was released as a single in 1969 and reached No. 4 in the UK charts and No. 19 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. When you listen to Pete Townshend’s isolated guitars, you’ll hear there are two acoustic guitars, one playing the low 8th note pedal note on the intro parts, which then doubles the other acoustic during the strumming. The electric guitar, which plays on the intro, first verse and chorus.

Townshend once called Pinball Wizard “the most clumsy piece of writing [he’d] ever done.”

Rod Stewart performed the song for the 1972 orchestral version of Tommy, and it is included on several of Stewart’s greatest hits compilations. According to the book The Duh Awards by Bob Fenster, Rod Stewart asked Elton John if he should accept an offer to sing in a film version of “Tommy.” John replied no way, “Don’t touch it with a barge pole.” A year later, The Who asked John to sing the same song, and he agreed. “I don’t think Rod’s quite forgiven me for that,” he commented years later.