Home Isolated Tracks

John Lennon and Yoko Ono co-produced the song and album of the same name with Phil Spector. Recording began at Lennon’s home studio at Tittenhurst Park, England, in May 1971, with final overdubs taking place at the Record Plant, in New York City, during July. One month after the September release of the LP, Lennon released “Imagine” as a single in the United States; the song peaked at number three on the Billboard Hot 100 and the LP reached number one on the UK chart in November, later becoming the most commercially successful and critically acclaimed album of Lennon’s solo career. Although not originally released as a single in the United Kingdom, it was released in 1975 to promote a compilation LP and it reached number six in the chart that year. The song has since sold more than 1.6 million copies in the UK; it reached number one following Lennon’s death in December 1980.

BMI named “Imagine” one of the 100 most-performed songs of the 20th century.

The single was produced by Smokey Robinson, and written by Robinson, and fellow Miracles members Ronald White, Pete Moore, and Marv Tarplin. One of the driving forces behind this awesome song was the innovative bass playing of James Jamerson. Here’s the isolated bass and drum tracks to the great Marvin Gaye’s hit “Ain’t That Peculiar,” which reached #8 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1965.

Found on his 2002 album, The Eminem Show, “Till I Collapse” has never been released as a single, but it has recharted on a few occasions when other Eminem albums have been released. In 2012 it was certified double-platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America for digital sales of 2,000,000 copies in the United States.

In the second verse, Eminem makes references to several rappers who he believes are the best in the industry. The list, in descending order, is Reggie (Redman), Jay-Z, Tupac Shakur, The Notorious B.I.G., André 3000, Jadakiss, Kurupt, Nas and then himself.

Fun Fact: During Saturday Night Live’s 25th Anniversary Special in 1999, the band played the first fifteen seconds of the song before their performance was “sabotaged” by Elvis Costello, who in 1977 had done the same to one of his own songs on the show; the Beastie Boys then accompanied him on “Radio, Radio”, the song performed during the original incident.

Due to heavy rotation on commercials and trailers, Imagine Dragon’s “Radioactive” the song became known in the industry as a sleeper hit, peaking at number three on the US Billboard Hot 100 chart, and has so far spent more than a year and a half on that chart. It became their first top 10 single, and also broke the record for slowest ascension to the Top 5 in chart history. The faster you go up on the charts, the faster you usually go back down again, and because this took so long to get into the Top 5, it currently holds the record for most weeks spent on the Billboard Hot 100 at 87 weeks.

It was the third best selling song of 2013, and was also the No. 3 song on the Billboard Hot 100 in 2013, ending the year behind “Thrift Shop” and “Blurred Lines.”

Inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame twice, 13 Grammy Awards as well as the Grammy Legend Award and the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, 26 American Music Awards, more than any other artist, including the “Artist of the Century” and “Artist of the 1980s”; 13 number-one singles in the United States in his solo career, more than any other male artist in the Hot 100 era; and the estimated sale of over 400 million records worldwide. Michael Jackson’s legendary status in music is set for a long, long time.

All of that aside, check out these isolated vocals from him. Mind. Blown.

Love IS like a bomb, baby, come and get it on. Classic 80s rock anthem “Pour Some Sugar On Me” appeared on Def Leppard’s 1987 Hysteria album. The tune hit #2 on the Billboard Hot 100, and it also helped the album sell over 20 million copies.

But it wasn’t an easy sell. Near the end of recording the album Hysteria, singer Joe Elliott was jamming with a riff he had come up with recently on an acoustic guitar. Producer Mutt Lange, expressing great liking of it, suggested that it be developed into another song. Although already behind schedule Lange felt that the album was still missing a strong crossover hit and that this last song had the potential to be one. Within two weeks the song was completed, smoothed out and included as the twelfth track on Hysteria.

By the spring of 1988, Hysteria had sold 3 million copies, but it still was not enough to cover the album’s production costs (the most expensive ever at the time). Thus, the band edited footage from an upcoming concert film to make a new promo clip for “Pour Some Sugar on Me” and finally released it as the fourth single in North America. THEN the album exploded.

Here are Steve Clark’s isolated guitars and Phil Collen and Joe Elliot’s backing vocals.