Home Isolated Tracks

Lorde’s “Royals” was first released on her debut extended play album, The Love Club EP in 2012, and later included on her debut studio album, Pure Heroine in 2013. Written by Lorde and Joel Little and produced by the latter, the song lyrically disapproves of the luxurious lifestyle of contemporary artists. Lorde wrote the lyrics to “Royals” in July 2012 at her house, taking half an hour, after seeing an image by photographer Ted Spiegel in the July 1976 edition of National Geographic showing Kansas City Royals baseball player George Brett signing baseballs, with his team’s name emblazoned across his shirt. Lorde recalled during a VH1 interview, “It was just that word. It’s really cool.”

David Bowie’s Fame was written by Bowie, Carlos Alomar and John Lennon, and it was a hit in North America, becoming Bowie’s first number 1 single in the Canadian Singles Chart as well as the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. The song was one of the most successful singles of the year, ranking at number 7 on the Billboard Year-End Hot 100. The song is one of four of Bowie’s songs to be included in The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll.

Bowie would later describe the song as “nasty, angry”, and fully admitted that it was written “with a degree of malice” aimed at the Mainman management group with whom he had been working at the time. In 1990, Bowie reflected: “I’d had very upsetting management problems and a lot of that was built into the song. I’ve left all that behind me, now… I think fame itself is not a rewarding thing. The most you can say is that it gets you a seat in restaurants.”

With one of the most in demand concert outings of the year, music legend Brian Wilson is extending the final performance run of his Pet Sounds 50th Anniversary World Tour and announcing a slate of new North American show dates for 2017 to celebrate and perform the iconic album Pet Sounds for a final time. Currently on the road and performing his last shows of the year, the tour will pick up again in the spring with an initial 37 new dates added to the Pet Sounds: The Final Performances tour run. VIP ticket presales begin today with general onsale beginning Friday. A full list of tour dates is below with up-to-date ticketing, show information and more at www.brianwilson.com.In addition, fans everywhere can now purchase the autobiography “I Am Brian Wilson: A Memoir” (De Capo Press), available at retailers everywhere.

So, a good enough reason to take a listen to three songs of isolated vocals and endless harmony. Released by The Beach Boys in 1966 on their Pet Sounds album, all three tracks were produced by group member Brian Wilson.

The third single from Michael Jackson’s sixth solo album, Thriller, “Beat It” received the Grammy Awards for Record of the Year and Best Male Rock Vocal Performance, as well as two American Music Awards. It was inducted into the Music Video Producers Hall of Fame.

Eddie Van Halen, lead guitarist of Van Halen, was asked to add a guitar solo. When initially contacted by Jones, Van Halen thought he was receiving a prank call. Having established that the call was genuine, Van Halen recorded his guitar solo free of any charge. “I did it as a favor”, the musician later said. “I was a complete fool, according to the rest of the band, our manager and everyone else. I was not used. I knew what I was doing – I don’t do something unless I want to do it.”

The Beatles’ “Drive My Car” was recorded on October 13, 1965 during the Beatles’ first recording session to extend past midnight. Paul McCartney worked closely with George Harrison on the basic rhythm track, the pair playing, in author Ian MacDonald’s description, “similar riffing lines on bass and low guitar”, respectively, as per Harrison’s suggestion. Harrison had been listening to Otis Redding’s “Respect” at the time and, as a result of this influence, “Drive My Car” contains more bottom end than previous Beatles recordings, mimicking the bass-heavy sound in Redding’s Memphis studio. Listen to how McCartney plays the bass line of the chorus differently, sometimes even within the same chorus.

“Rosanna” is a song written by David Paich and performed by the American rock band Toto, the opening track and the first single from their 1982 album Toto IV. This song won the Record of the Year Grammy Award in the 1983 presentations. Rosanna was also nominated for the Song of the Year award.

The song Rosanna peaked at No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 for five consecutive weeks, behind two songs, “Don’t You Want Me” by The Human League and “Eye of the Tiger” by Survivor.[2] It was also one of the band’s most successful singles in the UK, peaking at No. 12 on the UK Singles Chart and remaining on the chart for eight weeks.

The drum pattern is known as a “half-time shuffle”, and shows “definite jazz influence”.Featuring ghost notes and derived from the combination of the Purdie shuffle and the Bo Diddley beat. The Purdie shuffle can be prominently heard on Steely Dan’s track “Home At Last” from Aja, which Jeff Porcaro cited as an influence.

Here’s the song in full:

And here are the isolated tracks:

“Something” is a song by the Beatles, written by George Harrison and released on the band’s 1969 album Abbey Road. It was also issued on a double A-sided single with another track from the album, “Come Together”. “Something” was the first Harrison composition to appear as a Beatles A-side, and the only song written by him to top the US charts before the band’s break-up in April 1970. The single was also one of the first Beatles singles to contain tracks already available on an LP album. Frank Sinatra loved “Something”, calling it “the greatest love song of the past 50 years”