Home Isolated Tracks

From their Abacab album, here’s Man On The Corner, which peaked at No. 41 on the UK Singles Chart and No. 40 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100.

Invisible Touch is the thirteenth studio album from the band, released in 1986. The album was written entirely through group improvisations; no material developed prior to recording was used. It spawned five top five singles on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, “Invisible Touch”, “Throwing It All Away”, “Land of Confusion”, “In Too Deep”, and “Tonight, Tonight, Tonight”, with “Invisible Touch” reaching the top spot, the only Genesis single to do so.

In Too Deep won the “Most Performed Song from a Film” award at the BMI Film & TV Awards in 1988.

Hold On To My Heart was released as the third single from their 1991 album We Can’t Dance. The song proved to be successful in both the UK and the U.S. reaching number one on the US Adult contemporary charts, Canadian singles chart and number twelve on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100, it also peaked number 16 on the official UK singles chart. It was the last Top 20 single for Genesis on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100.

Skrillex and Diplo featuring Justin Bieber’s “Where Are Ü Now” peaked at number eight on the Billboard Hot 100, giving both Skrillex and Diplo their first top 10 hit on the chart, also giving Bieber his seventh. The song was certified platinum in the U.S. Internationally, the song has peaked within the top ten of the charts in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, Sweden, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, as well as the top twenty of the charts in the Czech Republic, Norway, the Netherlands, and Slovakia.

“I Want You Back” is the debut major-label single for The Jackson 5 which became a number-one hit for the band and the Motown label in early 1970. The song, along with a B-side cover of Smokey Robinson & the Miracles’ “Who’s Lovin’ You”, was the only single from the first Jackson 5 album, Diana Ross Presents the Jackson 5. It went to number one on the Soul singles chart for four weeks and held the number-one position on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart for the week ending January 31, 1970. “I Want You Back” was ranked 121st on Rolling Stone’s list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

Wilton Felder is the American saxophone and bass player best known as a founding member of The Jazz Crusaders, later known as The Crusaders. Felder, Wayne Henderson, Joe Sample, and Stix Hooper founded the group while in high school in Houston. The Jazz Crusaders evolved from a straight-ahead jazz combo into a pioneering jazz-rock fusion group, with a definite soul music influence. Felder worked with the original group for over thirty years, and continues to work in its current versions, which often feature other founding members.

Felder also worked as a West coast studio musician, mostly playing electric bass, for various soul and R&B musicians, and was one of the in-house bass players for Motown Records, when the record label opened up operations in Los Angeles, California, in the early 1970s. Along with The Jackson 5’s “I Want You Back” he also played on “The Love You Save,” for Marvin Gaye and Grant Green. He has also played bass for soft rock groups like America and Seals and Crofts. Also of note was his contribution to the John Cale album, Paris 1919, and Billy Joel’s Piano Man and Streetlife Serenade albums. He was one of three bass players on Randy Newman’s Sail Away (1972) and Joan Baez Diamonds & Rust. Felder also anchored albums from Joni Mitchell and Michael Franks.

“Rock of Ages” by Def Leppard is from their 1983 album Pyromania. When released as a single in the United States, the song reached number 16 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and number one on the Top Tracks rock chart, and has been played at almost every concert since then.

These four words that you hear at the start of “Rock of Ages”, mean nothing, though the band sometimes jokingly claims it means “running through the forest silently”. It’s actually just German sounding gibberish, said by producer Mutt Lange during one of the later takes of the song. Lange was a perfectionist and would often do dozens & dozens of takes, and after repeatedly beginning so many with the standard count, “One, two, three, four” he simply started saying nonsense words instead, the band liking this one so much that they included it on the album.

Yes’s first track and single from their eleventh studio album (and still great) 90125, Owner Of A Lonely Heart was released in 1983. Written primarily by guitarist Trevor Rabin, contributions were made to the final version by lead singer Jon Anderson, bassist Chris Squire and producer Trevor Horn. This was the album that, like Genesis and Moody Blues around this time, gave the veteran band an extended life and a fascinating listen still to this day.

“Turn! Turn! Turn! (To Everything There Is a Season)” was written by Pete Seeger in the late 1950s. The lyrics, except for the title which is repeated throughout the song, and the final verse of the song, are adapted word-for-word from Chapter 3 of the Book of Ecclesiastes, set to music and recorded in 1962. The song was originally released as “To Everything There Is a Season” on The Limeliters’ album Folk Matinee and then some months later on Seeger’s own The Bitter and the Sweet. The song became an international hit in late 1965 when it was covered by the American folk rock band The Byrds, bowing at #80 on October 23, 1965, before reaching #1 on the Hot 100 chart on December 4, 1965, #3 in Canada (Nov. 29, 1965), and also peaking at #26 on the UK Singles Chart. In the U.S., the song holds distinction as the #1 hit with the oldest lyrics (Book of Ecclesiastes), theoretically authored by King Solomon.

“Mr. Tambourine Man” was the debut single by The Byrds and was released on April 12, 1965 and was influential in originating the musical style known as folk rock, with the single becoming the first folk rock smash hit. Indeed, the term “folk rock” was first coined by the U.S music press to describe the band’s sound at around the same time as “Mr. Tambourine Man” peaked at number 1 on the Billboard chart. The single initiated the folk rock boom of 1965 and 1966, with many acts imitating the band’s hybrid of a rock beat, jangly guitar playing and poetic or socially conscious lyrics. You can hit a bit of the music before the isolated vocals come in.

Written by Stevie Nicks to express the grief resulting from the death of her uncle Jonathan and the murder of John Lennon during the same week of December 1980, the song is still a stunner.

According to Nicks, the title came from a conversation she had with Tom Petty’s first wife, Jane, about the couple’s first meeting. Jane said they met “at the age of seventeen”, but her strong Southern accent made it sound like “edge of seventeen” to Nicks. The singer liked the sound of the phrase so much that she told Jane she would write a song for it and give her credit for the inspiration.

…and here’s the video:

“Suspicious Minds” was written by American songwriter Mark James, and after his recording failed commercially, the song was handed to Elvis Presley by producer Chips Moman, becoming a number one song in 1969, and one of the most notable hits of Presley’s career. “Suspicious Minds” was widely regarded as the single that returned Presley’s career success, following his ’68 Comeback Special. It was his seventeenth and last number-one single in the United States. Rolling Stone later ranked it No. 91 on their list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

And it’s my favourite Elvis song of all time.

“Radio Free Europe” was released as R.E.M.’s debut single on the short-lived independent record label Hib-Tone in 1981. In 2010, it was added to the Library of Congress’s National Recording Registry for setting “the pattern for later indie rock releases by breaking through on college radio in the face of mainstream radio’s general indifference.”

“Superman” is a 1969 song by the Texas band The Clique, made more famous in 1986 when recorded by R.E.M. Lead singer Michael Stipe was not as enthusiastic about recording the song as the other band members were, and as a result bassist Mike Mills debuted on lead vocals with Stipe providing background.

Driver 8 was the second single from R.E.M.’s third album, Fables of the Reconstruction. Released in September 1985, the song peaked at #22 on the U.S. Billboard Mainstream Rock Tracks chart. The song refers to the Southern Crescent, a passenger train operated by the Southern Railroad until 1979, and continues today (with fewer stops) as the Amtrak Crescent.

“These Days” is from From Lifes Rich Pagent, which the album title is based on an English idiom, but R.E.M.’s use is, according to guitarist Peter Buck, from the 1964 film A Shot in the Dark, minus the apostrophe.
Now I’m not feeding off you
I will rearrange your scales if I can, and I can
Marching to the ocean, marching to the sea, I had a hat
I dropped it down and it sunk, reached down
Picked it up, slapped it on my head

..and from Accelerate, here’s “Living Well Is The Best Revenge”

R.E.M.’s “It’s the End of the World as We Know It (And I Feel Fine)” appeared on their 1987 album Document, the 1988 compilation Eponymous, and the 2006 compilation And I Feel Fine… The Best of the I.R.S Years 1982–1987. It was released as a single in November 1987, reaching No. 69 in the US Billboard Hot 100 and later reaching No. 39 in the UK singles chart on its re-release in December 1991.

Before the supposed Mayan apocalypse on December 21, 2012, sales for the song jumped from 3,000 to 19,000 copies for the week. A radio station in Calgary, Canada (CFEX x92.9 FM) on December 21, 2012 played the song 156 times in a row back to back to coincide with the Mayan apocalypse event.

…and here’s the original.