Home Isolated Tracks

John Lennon plays I Feel Fine’s main riff on his Gibson while George Harrison sometimes doubles, and other times plays rhythm on his Gretsch Tennessean. At the time of the song’s recording, the Beatles, having mastered the studio basics, had begun to explore new sources of inspiration in noises previously eliminated as mistakes (such as electronic goofs, twisted tapes, and talkback). I Feel Fine marks one of the earliest examples of the use of feedback as a recording effect in popular music. Artists such as the Kinks and the Who had already used feedback live, but Lennon remained proud of the fact that the Beatles were perhaps the first group to deliberately put it on vinyl.

Led Zeppelin’s “Whole Lotta Love” is one of the greatest opening tracks on any album. This one, though, happened to be on one of the greatest rock albums in history – Led Zeppelin II. The US release became their first hit single, it was certified Gold in April 1970, having sold one million copies. As with other Led Zeppelin songs, no single was released in the United Kingdom, but singles were released in Germany (where it reached number one), the Netherlands (where it reached number four), Belgium and France.

In 2004, the song was ranked number 75 on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, and in March 2005, Q magazine placed “Whole Lotta Love” at number three in its list of the 100 Greatest Guitar Tracks. It was placed 11 on a similar list by Rolling Stone. In 2009 it was named the third greatest hard rock song of all time by VH1. In 2014, listeners to BBC Radio 2 voted “Whole Lotta Love” as the greatest guitar riff of all time.

VOCAL only (Robert Plant):

GUITAR only (Jimmy Page)–check out what Page does starting at the 1:54 mark:

SLIDE GUITAR/THEREMIN/MISC. GUITAR overdubs only (Jimmy Page)

DRUMS (John Bonham) starts around :40 mark. Check out the funky words at 3:46…:

BASS (John Paul Jones):

 

Peter Gabriel’s “Sledgehammer” was produced by Daniel Lanois and found on his massive “So” album. It hit number one in Canada on 21 July 1986, where it spent four weeks; number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the United States and number four on the UK Singles Chart, thanks in part to a popular and influential music video. It was his biggest hit in North America and ties with “Games Without Frontiers” as his biggest hit in the United Kingdom.

The song’s music video has won a number of awards, including a record nine MTV Awards at the 1987 MTV Video Music Awards[5] and Best British Video at the 1987 Brit Awards.[ Gabriel was also nominated for three Grammy Awards: Best Male Rock Vocal Performance, Song of the Year and Record of the Year. As of 2011, “Sledgehammer” is the most played music video in the history of MTV.

Peter’s vocals start at the 0:50 mark.

Here’s the original award-winning video:

Bruce Springsteen’s “Born to Run” is one of the greatest rock songs ever recorded. Upon its release, music critic Robert Christgau took note of its wall of sound influence and called it “the fulfillment of everything ‘Be My Baby’ was about and lots more.”

The first recording of the song was made by Allan Clarke of the British group The Hollies, although its release was delayed, only appearing after Springsteen’s own now-famous version.

Listen for how out Bruce breathes during the breaks, however small, between the lines. Bruce doesn’t even double track his vocal until the end at 4:02.

From Blondie’s third studio release Parallel Lines, “Heart Of Glass” became a signature hit for the group, highlighted by Deborah Harry’s effervescent vocals. The track went to #1 in most world territories including the U.S. and U.K. The album was recorded at The Record Plant in New York City and produced by Mike Chapman, who also worked with Sweet, The Knack and others.

Here’s what you need for this chilly day – 3 absolute classics from The Beach Boys’ and their isolated vocals for you to blow your mind.

California Girls: Listen for a few spots of imperfect harmonies. That would have never pass if it was released today, which makes it all the more brilliant.

Wouldn’t It Be Nice?: Brian Wilson described the song as “what children everywhere go through … wouldn’t it be nice if we were older, or could run away and get married”.

Sloop John B: The Kingston Trio’s 1958 recording of “The John B. Sails” recorded under the title “The Wreck of the John B” was the direct influence on The Beach Boys’ version.

“We Are the Champions” by Queen for their 1977 album News of the World, isn’t just one of the band’s most famous and popular songs, it’s among music’s most recognisable anthems.

The song was a worldwide success, reaching number two in the UK Singles Chart, and number four on the Billboard Hot 100 in the United States. In 2009, “We Are the Champions” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame, and was voted the world’s favourite song in a 2005 Sony Ericsson world music poll. In 2011, a team of scientific researchers concluded that the song was the catchiest in the history of popular music.

VOCAL only (Freddie Mercury):

GUITARS only (Brian May):

DRUMS  only (Roger Taylor):

VOCAL (Mercury), PIANO (Mercury), RHYTHM GUITAR (May) only:

Written by June Carter Cash and Merle Kilgore and popularized by Johnny Cash, “Ring of Fire” appears on Cash’s 1963 album, Ring of Fire: The Best of Johnny Cash. The song was originally recorded by June’s sister, Anita Carter, on her Mercury Records album Folk Songs Old and New (1963) as “(Love’s) Ring of Fire”. “Ring of Fire” ranked No. 4 on CMT’s 100 Greatest Songs in Country Music in 2003 and #87 on Rolling Stone’s list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

The song was recorded on March 25, 1963, and became the biggest hit of Johnny Cash’s career, staying at number one on the charts for seven weeks. It was certified Gold on January 21, 2010 by the R.I.A.A. and has also sold over 1.2 million digital downloads.

Although “Ring of Fire” sounds somewhat ominous, the term refers to falling in love – which is what June Carter was experiencing with Johnny Cash at the time. Some sources claim that Carter had seen the phrase “Love is like a burning ring of fire,” underlined in one of her uncle A. P. Carter’s Elizabethan books of poetry. She worked with Kilgore on writing a song inspired by this phrase as she had seen her uncle do in the past. She had written: “There is no way to be in that kind of hell, no way to extinguish a flame that burns, burns, burns”.