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Jerry Seinfeld

Jerry Seinfeld doesn’t play colleges and has no plans to do so in the near future because of how politically-correct kids are these days.

Following his much-talked about comments from last week about college students becoming too politically correct, Jerry Seinfeld elaborated his point during Late Night with Seth Meyers Tuesday night. When Seth Meyers noted that there are more people than ever now who will “let you know you went over the line” in comedy than ever before, Seinfeld agreed.

“And they keep moving the lines in, for no reason,” Seinfeld said, citing the uncomfortable feeling he now gets from his audience when he tells his joke about people who scroll through their phone like a “gay French king.”

“Are you kidding me?” he asked. “I could imagine a time where people say, ‘Well, that’s offensive to suggest that a gay person moves their hands in a flourishing motion and you now need to apologize.’ I mean, there’s a creepy PC thing out there that really bothers me.”

Tonight, I watched the interview of Howard Stern and Jerry Seinfeld again for around the 10th time. Like one of my favourite albums, there’s always something new I catch, and the sense of liberation Jerry has wins out every time. His wonderfully barbed admission are brilliant, and here are the top 10 lines from Jerry.

1. In comedy, the worst thing is when you get comfortable. That’s why success is the enemy of comedy.
2. I had been on The Tonight Show for 9 years. Nobody at NBC, not one person, after 9 years of going on Carson, 3 or 4 times a year, and killing, nobody said, why don’t we talk to this kid? (Howard: Why do you think that is?) Really? Really? (Silence.) Because…Network television companies struggle with the entertainment field. They struggle to create entertainment. It’s a struggle for them.
3. I’m not that big on enjoyment. I don’t think it’s that important. I think what’s important that they enjoy it.
4. On Johnny Carson’s advice: Don’t ever think you know what’s going to happen in this business.
5. The Seinfeld Chronicles didn’t do well for the first 4 years. We had a very high income demo. Horrible ratings, but the people we got were high income. You get rich people to watch your show, you’re going to stay on.
6. Every second of my existence, I’m thinking, can I do something with that?
7. If you’re a comedian and you’re playing golf, you’re going nowhere in this business.
8. When I used to fly in coach, and the stewardess used to close the little thing, and they kinda give you a look in coach like “Maybe if you had worked a little harder, I wouldn’t have to do this.”
9. I think I know why Dennis Miller is doing that (more political comedy). That’s what he wants to do.
10. Your blessing in life is when you find the torture you’re comfortable with.
11. Would I want to be young again? No. If you’re a little lucky in life, you should enjoy getting older. Because you’re going to see more. When you’re young, you can’t see what’s going on so well. You get older, you walk into a room, and you meet this guy and that guy, and you go, Oh, I know exactly what’s going on here.
12. I’m so lost in my own head, I’m not thinking about what other people… “Do people expect you to be funny all the time?” I get that question. What do I know about what people expect? What do I care what people expect? Your expectations are your problem.
13. You can get any moron to talk about themselves, and you’ll kinda find some weird thing about them that is kind of interesting.
14. When you really evolve, you can just do things. Stop talking about it.

In this hilarious sketch shown for SNL’s 40th anniversary show, we only saw one view, and now NBC has released new 360° videos of some of the scenes. In this one, Alex Trebek (Will Ferrell) tries his best to keep contestants Sean Connery (Darrell Hammond), Justin Bieber (Kate McKinnon), Tony Bennett (Alec Baldwin), Burt Reynolds (Norm Macdonald), Christoph Waltz (Taran Killam), Matthew McConaughey (Jim Carrey) and Bill Cosby (Kenan Thompson) in line.

Jerry Seinfeld fields questions from audience members Michael Douglas, John Goodman, James Franco, Larry David, Tim Meadows, Dakota Johnson and Sarah Palin.

For more virtual reality/360 experiences like this one, download the Vrse app at http://vrse.com

Today is Malala Day around the world. Watch Malala Yousafzai on her 16th birthday speaking at the UN.

Just. Wow. Video Deconstructing The Beatles’ “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band”.

Bob Dylan performs 5 songs on Canadian TV show Quest in 1964.

Talking to the Seinfeld Writer Behind ‘Yada Yada Yada’ and ‘Double-Dipping’.

How The Beatles’ “A Hard Day’s Night” Made History As A Rock Musical.

Questlove And The Roots: How A Hip-Hop Band Conquered Late Night.

The Ramones’ 1975 Band Bio, Written by Tommy Ramone.

These pandas going down a slide is the best thing you’ll see all weekend.

Properties of Tony Blair, Sir Paul McCartney and Katherine Jenkins are blurred on Google Street View.

Facebook Becomes A Local Party Discovery Tool With “Events For You” Redesign.

A Guide To Taking That Step From Just Making Music To Going Pro.

You Need These 6 Qualities To Be A Successful Musician.

7 Lessons From Pomplamoose on Being a Musical Entrepreneur.

From The New Yorker:

Before Seinfeld, there were never any sitcoms that let their characters be purely selfish, treating the rest of humankind as a resource or obstacle while standing back and observing their shenanigans with a jaundiced detachment. But David’s “no learning” ethos has since become a mantra for the medium, at least insofar as it has encouraged the writers of sitcoms and dramas alike to be true to whatever their vision may be, and not trouble themselves too much with whether you approve of what the characters say and do. Would Tony Soprano have strangled that snitch in the woods, would Six Feet Under’s Nate Fisher have been a sonofabitch right up to his final moments on Earth, would 30 Rock’s Jenna have treated the entire known universe as a ladder leading to her own career success, if Seinfeld hadn’t steamrolled an artistic path for them back in the early ’90s?

Even the end of Seinfeld feels like a harbinger of a particular kind of finale: one in which a show’s creators seem to be deliberately provoking the viewers to hate them and question whether the years they spent watching the series were wasted. The foursome were literally put on trial for being assholes after watching a man get carjacked in small-town Massachusetts and cracking jokes about his weight instead of helping him. (Kramer videotaped the whole thing.) The episode had, to use an aughts word, a troll-y quality. On the one hand, it seemed to be giving a certain sector of the audience—moralizers who were deeply uncomfortable with how much they enjoyed Seinfeld—a kind of catharsis-by-punishment. (David Chase would later joke that Seinfeld and The Sopranos should have switched endings.) The last pre-credits moment—Jerry, Elaine, George, and Kramer blathering cheerfully in a holding cell—seemed like a middle finger to viewers who wanted confirmation that the characters had grown or at least seen the error of their ways. The credits unreeled over footage of Jerry in an orange jumpsuit, performing for an audience of fellow prisoners. Once again, the Seinfeld characters had reverted to type, hugging no one, learning nothing. Not giving a damn what anyone thinks of you can land a person in jail, but for artists, it’s liberating.

Jerry Seinfeld sat down with Wired to answer a number of technology-related etiquette questions like “Is it okay to video a concert with my iPad?”

As technology pioneers, we are inundated with new gadgets, services, apps, messaging, games, and media. We’re doxing, vaping, and Lyfting. And that means there are new rules for how to behave. Is it ok to answer an email during dinner? Is Google Glass ever cool? We got some help from Jerry Seinfeld, keen observer of social mores and foibles, on how to cope with modern technology… and whether it’s ok to “Like” a Facebook posting that someone died.

Last week, Jerry Seinfeld presented a fourth-season episode of his smash web series Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, a uniquely personal and intimate look at comedy and life with such luminaries as David Letterman, Tina Fey, and Chris Rock. Held at The Paley Center for Media in New York, Jerry discussed the production of this compelling and hilarious project, but unfortunately coffee was not allowed in the theater. You can watch the video in full here.